Jepson Herbarium Public Programs


         
   

Bruce Baldwin identifying a plant Tejon Workshop, 2018 Class in the White Mountains Margriet Wetherwax examining a plant

The Jepson Herbarium is the epicenter of research and education on the native and naturalized plants of California. Each year, the Herbarium provides educational opportunities for a broad audience of professional and amateur botanists. The program serves as a liaison between the scientific community and the public, a role we continue to be dedicated to in our 29th year of public programs.

We hope you will join us for another season of learning about the flora of California!

We also hope our online resources will be helpful in your study of the flora.
Jepson eFlora
Jepson Videos
Consortium of California Herbaria

The Jepson Herbarium is committed to fostering an environment that is supportive, welcoming, and respectful of all individuals and we follow the UC Berkeley principles of community. We welcome feedback about improvements we can make.

 
   

A message to our Friends about the Jepson Workshop program.

In 2022, the Jepson Herbarium will be offering two different kinds of programs, Weekend Workshops, most of which will be in person and Mini-Workshops, all of which will be virtual. Below we have listed all of the workshops, separated into two distinct groups so be sure and take a look at the full program. Prices for Weekend Workshops are listed as member of the Friends/non-member.

WEEKEND WORKSHOPS

Registration procedure: To enroll in a workshop, please fill out the interest form (link at the end of each course description). After January 10th, you will receive an email confirming your registration or letting you know you are on the waiting list. If you are enrolled, you will receive an invoice for the non-refundable $75 deposit to secure your spot. Payments must be made online. Please contact Roxanne Andersen (roxannea@berkeley.edu) if you need to make alternative payment arrangements.

All participants attending in-person workshops will be required to show proof of vaccination for COVID-19 before attending. The full UC Berkeley policy is here.

Changes in the Boraginaceae: New families, new genera, and new species

February 26, 2022
Michael G. Simpson, Matt Guilliams, Kristen Hasenstab-Lehman, and Makenzie Mabry
Virtual workshop

This course will review changes in the plant family Boraginaceae, to be reflected in the December 2021 Jepson eFlora revisions. Based on molecular phylogenetic studies, the family as it was previously circumscribed, is now split into six: Boraginaceae, Ehretiaceae, Heliotropiaceae, Hydrophyllaceae, Lennoaceae, and Namaceae. We will briefly review the evidence that supports these new family circumscriptions.

The majority of the course will focus on a review of the California genera of the Boraginaceae s.s. (in the strict sense, as newly treated in the eFlora), focusing on subtribe Amsinckiinae, the “popcorn flowers.” Using updated taxonomic keys, we present the currently circumscribed genera of this complex, including four genera previously included within Cryptantha and three genera previously included within Plagiobothrys, and one genus previously included within Pectocarya. Diagnostic features of these genera will be reviewed and major species complexes within them illustrated primarily with nutlet images. We aim to present participants with an overview of identification of these plants, often considered difficult even by professional botanists.

Virtual workshop.
Start/End: Saturday 9:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Course Fee: $125/$155

If you are interested in this workshop, please fill out this Google form.

Fern evolution and identification, with an emphasis on California taxa   —  

March 18, 2022 and March 19 or March 20 (classroom and botanic garden), 2022
Carl Rothfels
Virtual and in-person at UC Berkeley

Become fern fluent! This course will be an introduction to the ferns of the world, with a focus on native species that occur in California. We will learn the basics of fern morphology (What is an indusium? Is a frond just a leaf by another name?), fern ecology (including the spectacular desert ferns of the southwest), fern evolution (Are ferns “ancient” plants? What are their closest living relatives?), and fern taxonomy (Why did all the Cheilanthes in California become Myriopteris?).

On Friday, the workshop will begin with a review of the morphology, evolution, and ecology of ferns and a description of the major groups of ferns (worldwide). In the afternoon, the workshop will focus on the classification of California ferns and the characters that define the major families and genera represented in California.

The in-person day (Saturday or Sunday) will begin with keying species that occur in the San Francisco Bay Area. This portion of the workshop will give participants hands-on experience using microscopes and identifying and understanding the characters needed to identify ferns. In the afternoon, participants will tour the UC Botanical Garden to see the impressive fern collection there and to practice their new-found skills.

Transportation not provided. Personal vehicle required for botanic garden field trip.
Start/End: Friday 9:00 am – 3:00 pm. (virtual)
In-person session at UC Berkeley - either Saturday OR Sunday (9:00 am – 4:00 pm).

Course Fee: $275/$305

If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please fill out this Google form.

50 Plant Families in the Field: San Francisco Bay Area   —  

March 24 – 27, 2022
Linda Beidleman
In-person at UC Berkeley and in the field at Bay Area sites

Are you ready to jump into botanical detective work? With a working knowledge of common plant families and comfort in using taxonomic keys, identification can be an enjoyable challenge. This workshop introduces students to the flora of the San Francisco Bay area and the techniques used to identify plants of California. Emphasis will be on learning to recognize characteristics of the Bay Area’s plant families. We will practice keying plants in the field using the third edition of the book Plants of the San Francisco Bay Region: Mendocino to Monterey (Linda H. Beidleman and Eugene N. Kozloff, 2014). A general familiarity with morphological terms is helpful but not necessary; these will be reviewed during the introductory session (in-person at UC Berkeley). The remainder of the workshop will be held outdoors, in local parks (rain or shine).

Participants may drive up to 75 miles per day to the field sites and walk up to three miles each day (easy hiking). We will have one mini-van available for transportation to field sites. Students must attend all four days of the workshop because the introductory information presented on the first day will lay the foundation for the rest of the workshop. Please note that this is an introductory workshop, geared towards beginning botanists. Participants must purchase their own copy of the book.

Transportation: Personal vehicle required for field trips (carpooling possible).
Hiking: Easy.
Start/End: Thursday 9:00 am – Sunday 2:00 pm.

Course Fee: $375/$405

If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please fill out this Google form.

Native Plants of the Central Valley's UC Merced Vernal Pool Grasslands Reserve, Day, and McKinney Ranch Preserves   —  

April 9 – 10, 2022
Joy Baccei and Jennifer Buck-Diaz
UC Merced and surrounding areas

Vernal pools are ephemeral wetlands that are scattered throughout the Central Valley of California. These pools function as islands in a sea of grasslands for the more than 200 species of plants that are associated with this unique habitat. The undulating microtopography of the landscape, Mediterranean climate, and impermeable subsurface soils cause pools to temporarily form in natural depressions during the winter; the pools rapidly disappear at the onset of summer. During the transition from aquatic to terrestrial conditions, these habitats erupt into spectacular floral displays of native plants, many of which are endemic to this environment in California, and many of which require special protection. In the state of California, over 90% of vernal pool wetland habitat has been lost in the last 200 years due to land use conversion, where only 10% remains, and only 3% of clay hardpan vernal pools remain.

This two-day workshop will provide an introduction to vernal pool ecosystems and the plants they support, with examples given on fairly new conservation lands that represent some of the last remaining intact clay pan vernal pool and grassland habitat in the state. Participants will be guided through the UC Merced Vernal Pool Grasslands Reserve, which represents 6,500 acres of conservation lands that are fairly new to the UC Natural Reserve System, as well as the newly acquired Day and McKinney Ranch conservation easements (360 and 3,600 acres respectively), protected by the Sierra Foothill Conservancy. Collectively, these conservation lands represent some of the largest remaining contiguous clay pan vernal pool habitat remaining in California. During the workshop, instructors will provide background information on vernal pool ecosystems, vernal pool plant natural history, plant identification, and the efforts and importance of conserving this diminishing ecosystem in California. We will be in the field rain or shine!

Note: Drop deadline = March 1, 2022 - workshop will be cancelled without sufficient rain.

Transportation: Personal vehicle required for field trips (carpooling possible).
Hiking: Easy to moderate, with very little elevation gain, over uneven, wet terrain.
Start/End: Saturday 9:00 am – 7:00 pm, Sunday 9:00 am – 3:00 pm.

Course Fee: $300/$330

If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please fill out this Google form.

50 Plant Families in the Field: Monterey Bay   —  

April 21 – 24, 2022
Linda Beidleman
Hastings Natural History Reservation and Monterey Bay field sites.

Are you ready to jump into botanical detective work? With a working knowledge of common plant families and comfort in using taxonomic keys, identification can be an enjoyable challenge. This workshop introduces students to the flora of the Monterey area and the techniques used to identify plants of California. Emphasis will be on learning to recognize characteristics of the area’s plant families. We will practice keying plants in the field using the third edition of the book Plants of the San Francisco Bay Region: Mendocino to Monterey (Linda H. Beidleman and Eugene N. Kozloff, 2014). A general familiarity with morphological terms is helpful but not necessary; these will be reviewed during the introductory session. Much of the workshop will be held outdoors.

Participants may drive up to 25 miles per day to the field sites and walk up to three miles each day (easy hiking). Please note that this is an introductory workshop, geared towards beginning botanists. Participants must purchase their own copy of the book.

Accommodations: Shared rooms with bunk beds located in different houses on the property. Tent camping sites will also be available.
Meals: Catered meals from dinner on Thursday through lunch on Sunday are included.
Transportation: Personal vehicle required for field trips (carpooling possible).
Hiking: Easy.
Start/End: Thursday 5:00 pm – Sunday 12:00 pm.

Course Fee: $550/$580

If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please fill out this Google form.

Flora of Northern Inyo County   —  

April 28 – May 1, 2022
Steve Schoenig and Dana York
Based in Bishop with travel to local field sites

The first day of the workshop will be spent exploring the eastern Sierra near Bishop. We will climb into the Buttermilks, an area renowned for its bouldering (rock climbing) opportunities, and chase wildflowers between the glacial erratics (aka the large boulders that were carried by glaciers away from where they originated). We may also venture into Bishop Creek canyon or lower Coyote Ridge depending on where the flowers are showing off.

On the second day, it's an early start and road trip to Eureka Dunes. The Eureka Dunes, added to Death Valley National Park with the passage of the California Desert Protection Act in 1994, lie in the remote Eureka Valley. Eureka Valley is an enclosed basin at an elevation of 3,000 feet located in the northern portion of the park. The dunes cover an area only 3 miles long and 1 mile wide, yet they are the tallest sand dunes in California and the second tallest in North America. They rise suddenly more than 680 feet above the dry lakebed at their western base. As tall as these dunes are, they are dwarfed by the impressive, striated limestone wall of the Last Chance Mountains which rises another 4,000 feet above the valley floor. This will be a long driving day (but worth it)!

At the top, the sweeping view seems reward enough for your efforts to achieve the summit, yet if the sand is completely dry you may experience one of the strangest phenomena to be found in the desert, singing sand. When the sand avalanches down the steepest face of the highest dune, a sound like a bass note of a pipe organ or the distant drone of an airplane can be heard emanating from the sand. If the dune is at all damp (even though it may not feel so to the touch) no sound will be made.

And did we mention the plants; well the dunes are home to numerous wildflowers especially in a good year! Besides cool wildflowers, participants will encounter the three notable Eureka Dunes endemic (found nowhere else) plants. They are shining milkvetch (Astragalus lentiginosus var. micans) CA Rare Plant Ranked 1B.2, Eureka Dunes evening primrose (Oenothera californica subsp. eurekensis) CA Listed Rare, CA Rare Plant Ranked 1B.2, and Eureka dunegrass (Swallenia alexandrae) Federal Listed Threatened, CA Listed Rare, CA Rare Plant Ranked 1B.2.

The Last Change Range are the northernmost mountains in the Mojave Desert and comprise a blending of Mojave and Great Basin flora. The beautiful layer cake of continuous geological strata spanning 180 million years of ocean sediments from the Cambrian to mid Paleozoic periods. By driving up Hanging Rock Canyon, eastward from Eureka Valley, we climb through many different layers but quickly top out in the famous Bonanza King formation of limestones and dolomites. Many of the plants up here are endemic to these desert carbonate cliffs and some are local endemics, found only in this region. We will see dozens of plants mainly found in Mojave carbonate substrates. We will also see rare plants such as Death Valley monkeyflower (Diplacus rupicola), Gilman's desert parsley and buckwheat (Cymopterous gilmanii, Eriogonum gilmannii), Nudestem sunray (Enceliopsis nudicaulis), Shockley's prickleleaf (Hecastocleis shockleyi), Panamint Phacelia (Phacelia perityloides) and many others. Of general interest (or abhorance) are artifacts of historic mining including the largest open-pit sulphur mine in North America.

The final half-day of the workshop will conclude with a short drive and hike to the Champion Spark Plug Mine (cool Jeffrey pine forest) in the White Mountains and/or a visit to Fish Slough to see the Fish Slough milkvetch (Astragalus lentiginosus var. piscinensis) and alkali mariposa lily (Calochortus striatus).

Accommodations: Participants are encouraged to stay in Bishop, CA.
Meals: Not provided.
Transportation: Personal vehicle required for field trip. Vehicles must have good clearance and sturdy tires (including spare!). High clearance 4x4 with extra passenger space preferred. Carpooling is encouraged. On the second day of the workshop, we will have a long drive to and from the field site (2.5 hours one way).
Hiking: Moderate to difficult and in extreme desert conditions (e.g., sun, heat, wind).
Start/End: Thursday 6:00 pm – Sunday 12:00 pm.
 – One week before there will be an introductory Zoom session.

Course Fee: $450/$480

If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please fill out this Google form.

Flora of the Northern Mendocino Coast   —  

May 13 – 15, 2020
Teresa Sholars
In-person at Mendocino Community College and in the field at local sites

The Mendocino Coast has a diverse flora rich in rare species and rare vegetation that is largely undocumented; many of the species have not yet been recorded for this area and none of the coastal terrace vegetation has been mapped. In this workshop we will spend most of the time in the field, checklist in hand, looking at the incredible floral displays and rare forest types that occur along the north coast of Mendocino County. Part of the itinerary will depend on the winter rains but on Saturday, an all-day hike is possible.

Accommodations: Not provided.
Meals: Not provided (for those that wish to join, we will have a potluck dinner on Friday night).
Transportation: Personal vehicle required for field trips (carpooling possible).
Hiking: Easy, but up to 5 miles.
Start/End: Friday 9:00 am – Sunday 12:00 pm.

Course Fee: $350/$380

If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please fill out this Google form.

Two Shastas: Shasta Valley and The Mysterious North Side of Mount Shasta   —  

June 23 – 26, 2022
Julie Kierstead and Heath Bartosh
Based in Weed with travel to local field sites

Shasta Valley, which lies in Siskiyou County of extreme northern California, is one of only two portals through the wall of the southern Cascades and Sierra Nevada mountains into the California Floristic Province. In full view of Mount Shasta (14,162 feet), this is an area of many species range limits coming from all directions. This high elevation valley has been a conduit for elements of the Great Basin flora, from the nearby Modoc Plateau in the east, on their westward migration, into the Klamath Ranges. Mt. Shasta's youthful volcanic influence dominates here with abundant basalt, particularly Pluto's Cave Basalt, as well as hills formed by the mountain's avalanche debris. This vulcanized valley is abutted by ancient sedimentary and metamorphic substrates of the adjacent Klamath and Sierran landscapes.

Join us as we botanize this poorly known land of juniper, bitterbrush, sagebrush, lava flows, ashy soils, and colorful annuals and perennials while being dwarfed by Mount. We may also have the opportunity to see post-fire flora within the footprint of the 2021 Lava Fire on the west slope of Mt. Shasta.

Accommodations: Not provided. Participants are encouraged to stay in Weed or Lake Shastina, or the town of Mt. Shasta.
Meals: Not provided.
Transportation: Personal vehicle required for field trip. Vehicles must have good clearance and sturdy tires (including spare!). High clearance 4x4 with extra passenger space preferred. Carpooling is encouraged.
Hiking: Moderate to difficult.
Start/End: Thursday 6:00 pm – Sunday 12:00 pm.
 – One week before there will be an introductory Zoom session.

Course Fee: $450/$480

If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please fill out this Google form.

Sky Island Flora of the White Mountains   —  

July 14 – 17, 2022
Jim Morefield and Marty Purdy
White Mountain Research Center, Bishop and Crooked Creek

The White Mountains are located at the southwest corner of the Great Basin floristic region, and their geologic and habitat diversity, high relief (spanning 4,000-14,246 feet elevation), and proximity to the Sierra Nevada and Mojave Desert all contribute to an unusually rich and well-documented flora of over 1,100 taxa. They are also known for the oldest living trees, the highest point in Nevada, and the third highest peak in California. By mid-July, the subalpine and alpine floras are coming into their peak blooming periods.

Through driving tours (up to 50 miles each day) and easy to moderate hikes (up to 4 miles), participants will have the opportunity to explore the southern half of the White Mountains, observing and identifying diverse plants and learning to recognize various geologic and ecologic settings that influence species distributions and adaptations. Thursday morning, we will start from Bishop and stop at several points up the elevation gradient to our weekend base station at Crooked Creek (10,000 feet). Friday and Saturday will be spent visiting wetland and upland sites in various geologic settings at elevations up to 13,000 feet, depending on seasonal conditions. Sunday morning will include additional field time before our final lunch stop as we leave the mountains.

Accommodations: Shared dormitories with bathrooms (participants must bring their own linens).
 – The Crooked Creek field station is at 10,000 feet and some of the field sites are a little higher. To prepare for the conditions of high elevation, participants are encouraged to spend the Wednesday before the workshop at an intermediate elevation.
Meals: Provided by field station.
Transportation: Personal vehicle required for field trip. Vehicles must have good clearance and sturdy tires (including spare!). High clearance 4x4 with extra passenger space preferred. Carpooling is encouraged.
Hiking: Easy to moderate (but at high elevation). If we go up any steep and/or rocky hillsides, it will be slowly while we look at plants, and the distances will be fairly short.
Start/End: Thursday morning – Sunday afternoon.
 – One week before there will be an introductory Zoom session.

Course Fee: $550/$580

If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please fill out this Google form.

Some Like It Hot: Late Summer Flora of the Eastern Mojave Highlands   —  

September 22 – 25, 2022
Jim André and Tasha La Doux
Sweeney Granite Mountains Desert Research Center

The Eastern Mojave Desert represents one of the most floristically diverse regions in California. This incredible diversity is, in part, due to the region’s proximity to the North American Monsoon and its prominent summer rainfall regime. Approximately 10% of eastern Mojave annuals are considered "summer annuals," species that germinate following summer rainfall. In addition, more than 25% of perennial species in this region flower in late summer/early fall. Examples of plant families that respond to summer rain include: Nyctaginaceae, Amaranthaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Polygonaceae, Poaceae, and Asteraceae. This course will introduce botanists to the ecology and taxonomy of the diverse late summer/early fall flora in the eastern Mojave Desert, with special emphasis on rare or unique species. Through field observation, lab identification, and evening presentations, participants will gain a better understanding of the major plant families that comprise the hot-season flora. This field-intensive workshop is intended for botanists with moderate to advanced taxonomic training, but also for those with an interest in learning more about this seldom-seen component of California’s flora. Field trips will target the mid to higher elevations of the Mojave National Preserve, planned in accordance to optimal blooming conditions.

Note: Drop dead deadline = August 31, 2022 - workshop will be cancelled without sufficient rain.

Accommodations: Shared dormitories with bunk beds. Tent camping will also be available.
Meals: Catered meals, dinner Thursday through lunch on Sunday are included.
Transportation: Personal vehicle required for field trip. Vehicles must have good clearance and sturdy tires (including spare!). High clearance 4x4 with extra passenger space preferred. Carpooling is encouraged.
Hiking: Easy to moderate ; short hikes in sometimes rugged terrain and desert conditions (sun, heat, wind).
Start/End: Thursday 4:00 pm – Sunday 12:00 pm.

Course Fee: $570/$600

If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please fill out this Google form.

Advanced grass identification   —  

November 5 – 6, 2022
J. Travis Columbus
UC Berkeley

For those who have taken the introductory workshop or have experience with grass identification, the advanced grasses workshop offers a greater variety of California genera and species for study, more practice with keying, and more genera to learn on sight. Completion of the introductory Poaceae workshop, or equivalent prior experience, is highly recommended. Participants are encouraged to bring samples of grasses to share with the group. Please note, this workshop will take place in the classroom and has no field component.

Experience required: Working knowledge of grass morphology and previous plant identification experience, including keying grasses.
Start/End: Saturday 8:30 am – Sunday 5:00 pm.

Course Fee: $350/$380

If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please fill out this Google form.

MINI-WORKSHOPS (all virtual)

Registration procedure: To enroll in a workshop, please fill out the interest form (link at the end of each course description). Approximately 30 days before the mini-workshop, you will receive an invoice for workshop fee. Payments must be made online. Please contact Roxanne Andresen (roxannea@berkeley.edu) to make alternative payment arrangements.

This mini-workshop series has been subsidized with an award from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and we are pleased to offer the workshops to participants for a reduced fee of $25/workshop.

Fiddleheads: Fern life cycles and identification

February 27, 2022
Carl Rothfels

This workshop will be a mix of short presentations, discussion periods, and then related individual or group activities. We will cover the foundations of fern biology including what makes a fern a fern and how to "speak fern"—what are the important features for identifying ferns, and how do we describe them. We will then broadly introduce particular groups of ferns, with a focus on the species most commonly encountered in California, and close with an introduction to resources that are useful for people interested in pursuing their pteridological interests. In advance of the workshop, all participants will be provided with some introductory materials to get everyone in the fern mood, and to allow us to make the most of our time together.

Start/End: Sunday 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm.

Course Fee: $25

If you are interested in this workshop, please fill out this Google form.

Introduction to Bryophytes

March 12, 2022
Brent D. Mishler

The bryophytes are a diverse group of plants with small stature and large ecological impact. There are some 23,000 described species worldwide, making it the largest group of land plants except for the flowering plants. The group includes three phylogenetically distinct lineages: mosses, hornworts, and liverworts. The bryophytes are a key group in our understanding of how the modern land plants (comprising the three bryophyte lineages plus the vascular plants) are related to each other phylogenetically and how they came to occupy the land environment. Although the bryophytes display much diversity, a major limitation in the use of bryophytes as study organisms has been the lack of basic floristic, ecological, and alpha-taxonomic knowledge of the plants in many regions, of which California and the southwestern United States are the most poorly known in North America.

This virtual workshop is designed to provide an introduction to bryophytes. For an in-depth experience with field techniques and identification using microscopes, please also join the SO BE FREE outing, hosted by the Bryophyte Chapter of the California Native Plant Society (March 25-28, 2022), in Zzyzx, California in the Mojave Desert.

Start/End: Saturday 9:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Course Fee: $25

If you are interested in this workshop, please fill out this Google form.

What’s that called? Flowers and leaf terminology for plant identification

April 2, 2022
Bruce G. Baldwin and Susan Fawcett

Join us for this beginner's guide to botany. This course welcomes those who would like to expand their knowledge of plants. Students will learn the basic concepts of plant morphology and the terminology needed to identify plants using botanical keys like those in the second edition of The Jepson Manual and the Jepson eFlora. We will cover the entire plant body, including stems, roots, leaves, flowers, and fruits!

Start/End: Saturday 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm.

Course Fee: $25

If you are interested in this workshop, please fill out this Google form.

California Seaweeds: Seashores, kelp forests and climate change

September 17, 2022
Kathy Ann Miller

The oceans dominate the Earth’s surface and algae play a vital role in ocean ecosystems and intertidal life. In this mini-worksop, we will learn about the major groups of seaweeds, where they live, and how they are built. We will specifically discuss species that are found in kelp forests and intertidal zones along the California coast. We will also talk about collecting and preserving seaweeds, consuming them for food, and how climate change is impacting algal communities.

Start/End: Saturday 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm.

Course Fee: $25

If you are interested in this workshop, please fill out this Google form.

A big world in a small package: Lichen biology, identification, and conservation

October 1, 2022
Klara Scharnagl

This workshop will serve as an introduction to lichens. What is a lichen? Where can we find them? How can we identify them? Workshop participants will learn to distinguish lichens from other potentially co-occurring organisms including mosses, liverworts and non-lichenized fungi. We will cover the main morphological groups of lichens, and participants will learn to distinguish fruiting bodies and other features associated with keying out lichens. After running through some examples of keying out lichens, with a focus on California species, participants will then learn about the biology of lichens, where they can be found, what they are doing within the environment, and what we can learn from different patterns of lichens that we see. In the final section of the workshop, we will dive back into the knowns and unknowns of the lichen symbiosis itself, and we will discuss the importance of lichen conservation. By the end of the workshop, participants will have an understanding of what a lichen is and how to identify it, the role of lichens in the environment, and why it is important to protect lichens for generations to come.

Start/End: Saturday 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm.

Course Fee: $25

If you are interested in this workshop, please fill out this Google form.

 

About Our Instructors

Jim André has served as Director of the University of California’s Granite Mountains Desert Research Center since 1994. Jim’s academic training is in plant ecology, taxonomy, and rare plant population biology. With 35 years of experience conducting floristic studies throughout the desert southwest, Jim has contributed 45,000 herbarium specimens and discovered and published several species new to science. He is author of floras of the Mojave National Preserve and San Bernardino County Desert Region (in press) and is currently working on a Flora of the Mojave Desert, a lifelong endeavor that spans four states. Jim has been a strong advocate for native plant conservation and serves as the Senior Advisor to the California Native Plant Society’s Rare Plant Program. He is a frequent lecturer and field instructor and has taught numerous workshops through the Jepson Herbarium at UC Berkeley.

Joy Baccei is the Director of the Merced Vernal Pool and Grasslands Reserve (MVPGR), where she directs and implements land stewardship, research, education, and outreach activities for the MVPGR and also serves as the contact for the SCICON Field Station, as part of the UC Merced Natural Reserve System. Prior to employment with UC Merced, she worked at Yosemite National Park for 18 years, in several capacities, including restoration and plant ecology, watershed, trail system, and wilderness management. Most recently, as an applied wetland ecologist, she oversaw wetland and rangeland ecological research, monitoring, and management. Baccei received a B.S. in Environmental Science (watershed science focus) from Humboldt State University, and an M.S. in Environmental Systems (wetland ecology focus) from UC Merced.

Bruce G. Baldwin is Curator of the Jepson Herbarium and Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at UC Berkeley. Bruce received his Ph.D. in Botany at UC Davis in 1989. His research emphasizes systematics (including the use of biosystematic, molecular, and phylogenetic methods) of Californian vascular-plant groups, especially our native Compositae. He is Convening Editor of the Jepson Flora Project, which has produced The Jepson Desert Manual (2002), the second edition of The Jepson Manual (2012), and the online Jepson eFlora since he arrived at Berkeley in 1994.

Heath Bartosh is Co‐Founder and Senior Botanist of Nomad Ecology, based in Martinez, California, and a Research Associate at the University and Jepson Herbaria at UC Berkeley. After graduating from Humboldt State University, Heath began his career as a professional botanist in 2002 and has been an earnest student of the California flora for nearly 20 years. His general research interests are in California vascular plant floristics with a focus on distribution, soil and geologic relationships, endemism, regional and local rarity, and habitat conservation. At a more specific level, his primary interests are floristics of the California Coast Ranges and the fire-following annual plant species found there. His research on post-fire floras focuses on the composition and duration of the eruptive dominance and subsequent fleeting abundance of annual plant species at regional scales within the California Coast Ranges. In 2009, he also became a member of the Rare Plant Program Committee at the state level of CNPS, helping to develop current and accurate information on the distribution, ecology, and conservation status of California's rare and endangered plants and promoting the use of this information to influence plant conservation in California.

Linda Beidleman has an M.S. in Biology from Rice University. She is co-author of Plants of the San Francisco Bay Region and Plants of Rocky Mountain National Park. She has worked with the California Native Plant Society, especially as co-supervisor for the CNPS East Bay plant nursery. Linda has taught short flora and ornithology courses for the Rocky Mountain National Park and the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies.

Jennifer Buck-Diaz is a vegetation ecologist and botanist with the CNPS Vegetation Program where she surveys, classifies, and maps vegetation across California. She has recently focused her work on the classification and description of grassland vegetation including the study of spatial and temporal dynamics in these systems. She earned both a B.S. and a M.S. degree in Plant Biology from the University of California, Davis where she participated in a state-wide classification project looking at fine-scale vegetation in vernal pools.

J. Travis Columbus is a Research Scientist at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden and Professor of Botany at Claremont Graduate University. He earned his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, where he studied Bouteloua (Poaceae) and related taxa. His current research focuses on the evolution and classification of grasses and buckwheats (Polygonaceae).

Susan Fawcett is a research botanist at the University and Jepson Herbaria and a faculty member at the University of Michigan Biological Station, where she teaches field botany and botanical illustration. Her current research is focused on phylogenomics, taxonomy, and historical biogeography of the fern family Thelypteridaceae. Susan recently received her doctoral degree from the University of Vermont where she worked in the Barrington/Sundue Lab.

Matt Guilliams is a plant systematist and Curator of the Clifton Smith Herbarium at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. His overall focus is the study of the flora of California, which includes floristics, biodiversity description, inferring evolutionary patterns, and conservation genetics of rare plants. Matt earned his B.S. and M.S. in Evolutionary Biology at San Diego State University and his Ph.D. in Integrative Biology from U.C. Berkeley. He has been working as a botanist in the state since 1998.

Kristen Hasenstab-Lehman is Conservation Geneticist and Lab Manager at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. She integrates field studies, molecular tools and histological techniques to document biodiversity and understand the interplay of ecological and evolutionary effects on a diversity of plants of conservation concern in California. After receiving a M.S. from San Diego State University, Kristen earned her Ph.D. in Botany at California Botanic Garden and worked at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in the plant DNA barcoding lab. She has been a California Botanist with a focus on the family Boraginaceae and the subtribe Amsinckiinae since 2006.

Julie Kierstead has spent her career promoting the discovery, enjoyment, and conservation of the flora of the western United States. From 1989 through 2019, she was Forest Botanist for the Shasta-Trinity National Forest in Northern California. Before that, she started the Berry Botanic Garden Seed Bank for Rare and Endangered Plants of the Pacific Northwest. Julie’s current focus is to encourage exploration and understanding of the Klamath Mountains flora. In recent years, she has collaborated on publishing several newly discovered plants of the Klamath Mountains, including Shasta huckleberry (Vaccinium shastense), Shasta maidenhair fern (Adiantum shastense), and Shasta fawn lily (Erythronium shastense). She instigated a taxonomic overhaul of the stonecrop (Sedum) section Gormania, resulting in a revision of the group. In 2019, Julie discovered a distinctive new species of Phacelia from the mountains of western Shasta County, soon to be published under the name Phacelia damnatio. Julie has contributed over 2,300 free-use photos to CalPhotos and many hundreds of voucher specimens from the Klamath and Cascade Ranges to California herbaria. She is a member of the Rare Plant Program Committee at the state level of CNPS and sits on the Board of Directors of Northern California Botanists.

Tasha La Doux has worked as the Assistant Director for the University of California’s Granite Mountains Desert Research Center since 2007; in addition, she continues to serve as the park botanist at Joshua Tree NP, and holds a Research Associate position at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden. She has worked as a botanist in the Desert Southwest since 1998 and remains actively involved in many aspects of botanical research, such as floristics, rare plant monitoring, demographics, reproductive studies, and vegetation ecology. Over the years, she has been invited to numerous events to speak on desert floristics, taught many botanical workshops, and led 100’s of students each year on field trips in the California deserts.

Makenzie Mabry is an iDigBio postdoctoral researcher with the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida. Her research aims to understand the evolutionary processes that produce diverse phenotypes in plants. Makenzie received her B.S. and M.S. from San Diego State University where she researched the evolutionary history of Cryptantha and earned her Ph.D. from the University of Missouri where she researched the origin of Brassica oleracea crops. Makenzie currently is working on ways in which digitized data can be used to inform future crop breeding efforts, especially in the face of climate change

Kathy Ann Miller has loved seaweeds since her first phycology class at the Bodega Marine Laboratory. She earned her B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Botany at UC Berkeley with advisors Paul C. Silva and Donald Kaplan. Her extensive time in the field over the last 40 years and her dedication to making specimens for the herbarium are the foundation of her knowledge of the seaweed flora of California, her chief research subject. Kathy Ann is the Curator of Algae at the University Herbarium, UC Berkeley.

Brent D. Mishler is Director of the University and Jepson Herbaria as well as a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology, where he teaches courses in phylogenetics, plant diversity, and island biology. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1984. His research interests are in the systematics, evolution, and ecology of bryophytes, especially the diverse moss genus Syntrichia, as well as in the phylogeny of green plants, spatial analysis of biodiversity, and theory of systematics.

Jim Morefield found love at first sight for the White Mountains while attending Deep Springs College between 1979-1981, which was followed by a B.S. in Botany and Geology at Northern Arizona University in 1986, and Ph.D. in Systematic Botany, focusing on Stylocline and Asteraceae, at Claremont Graduate University in 1992. Since then, he has been Lead Botanist for the Nevada Natural Heritage Program, specializing in rare plants of Nevada and the Great Basin, the flora of the White Mountains, and more broadly the desert flora of North America. He has contributed to several treatments of genera within the Asteraceae for both the Jepson Manual and the Flora of North America North of Mexico.

Marty Purdy is currently pursuing a M.S. in Botany at Claremont Graduate University and California Botanic Garden (formerly Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden) which he plans to defend this spring. For his thesis he is completing a checklist of the vascular and nonvascular plants of Coyote Ridge and Flat, a region of the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada with strong floristic overlap with the alpine White Mountains. Marty has a B.S. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and a B.A. in Environmental Studies from UC Santa Cruz, several years of field botany experience in the Eastern Sierra region, and a deep love and fascination for alpine plants.

Carl Rothfels is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology and the Curator of Pteridophytes at the University Herbarium. A relatively recent transplant to California, he was born and raised in southern Ontario (Canada) and received his Ph.D. from Duke University. His research focuses on the evolution of ferns and lycophytes, with particular interests in the fern family Cystopteridaceae, desert ferns in the genus Notholaena, and the processes of polyploidy and reticulation (hybridization).

Klara Scharnagl is the Tucker Curator of Lichenology at the University & Jepson Herbaria at UC Berkeley. Her fascination for the ecology and evolution of fungal symbioses has taken her from a master's at Florida International University on native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and salinity tolerance to a Ph.D. at Michigan State University on the latitudinal diversity gradient of lichens in the Americas to a postdoc at The Sainsbury Laboratory on the molecular mechanisms of the lichen symbiosis. Her current interests are turning towards California lichens, and patterns of diversity and symbiosis along north-south and coastal to inland gradients. She is also passionate about herbarium (lichenarium!) collections, and their uses in research, art, and education.

Steve Schoenig is retired Branch Chief for the Biogeographic Data Branch at the CA Dept of Fish and Game. He also led invasive weed programs at CA Dept of Food and Agricuture for many years. He is currently working on floristic studies of northern Death Valley NP has continued studying monkeyflowers for the past 35 years. He is coauthor of the recently published paper: Vascular Plants of Northern Death Valley National Park (Death Valley Last Chance Range, and Eureka Valley) Hester Bell, Sarah De Groot and Steve Schoenig.

Teresa Sholars is a Professor Emeritus from College of the Redwoods in Fort Bragg, California, where she taught classes in identification and ecology of the Mendocino Coast flora, along with mushroom identification and ecology for over 40 years. She is the rare plant and vegetation chair for the Dorothy King Young chapter of CNPS and a retired botanical and ecological consultant. Currently, she is an Adjunct Professor and Curator at the Mendocino College Coast Center Herbarium and Natural History Collection. Teresa is leading a group of volunteers to do relevé surveys to classify the coastal terraces and has also started to do rapid assessments in the associations nested in the coastal redwood forests. She is co-author of the treatment for perennial Lupinus in the first edition of The Jepson Manual, author of Lupinus in the second edition of The Jepson Manual, and author of the new perennial Lupinus treatment for Flora of North America North of Mexico and the new Lupinus treatment in the Jepson eFlora.

Michael G. Simpson is a Professor Emeritus of Biology at San Diego State University (SDSU) and curator of the SDSU Herbarium. His areas of expertise are plant taxonomy, plant systematics, and floristics. His research has centered on the monocot family Haemodoraceae, and his current research focus is on the biogeography, evolution, and taxonomy of the subtribe Amsinckiinae or the family Boraginaceae. He also studies biogeographic patterns and processes of plants with an American amphitropical distribution (AAD), those occurring in North America and South America but not in the intervening tropics. Dr. Simpson currently coordinates and co-teaches “Field Botany of San Diego County.” He is author of the widely used textbook Plant Systematics (Elsevier-Academic Press, 2006; 3rd edition 2019).

Dana York received his M.S. in Botany from California State University, Fresno, and his B.S. in Forest/Natural Resource Management from Humboldt State University. He has worked on floristic and special-status plant species surveys throughout California and Oregon on both public and private lands. He authored the Illustrated Flora of Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks. He has discovered new species in the Oregon Cascade and Sierra Nevada ranges, Northern California, and Death Valley National Park. He was Death Valley's botanist for nearly five years. In 2022, he is retiring after 25 years with the state as an Environmental Unit Supervisor for Caltrans, and he volunteers at the Humboldt State University herbarium. Follow him on IG at pct_botanist.