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A Series of Workshops on Botanical, Evolutionary, and Ecological Subjects for 2007

Table of Contents

     

Microbial Diversity: The Final Frontier
January 20, 2007

Evolution and Genomics: The New Modern Synthesis
January 27, 2007

Assembling (and using) the Fungal Tree of Life
February 3, 2007

"Arm-chair" Tree-Building: Phylogenetic Analysis Using Bioinformatic Resources

February 10, 2007

Peatmosses (Sphagnum)
February 24–25, 2007

Bryophyte Inventory and Sampling Techniques
March 2 –4, 2007

Vertebrate Phylogenetics
March 10, 2007

Introduction to Morphology and Identification of Flowering Plants
March 17–18, 2007

Fifty Plant Families in the Field    This workshop is FULL - wait list only
March 24–25 and March 31–April 1, 2007 (2 consecutive weekends)

Basics of Botanical Illustration
March 24–25, 2007

Spring Flora of Eastern San Diego and Imperial Counties
April 5–8, 2007

Lichens of the Mojave National Preserve
April 12–15, 2007

Basic Collecting Techniques and Vouchering Specimens
April 14–15, 2007

Chorizanthe
April 20–22, 2007

Using Electronic Keys (MEKA) to Identify California Plants
April 28, 2007 (8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon)

Introduction to Using Jepson Online Resources
April 28, 2007 (1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.)

Off the Beaten Path in the Shasta National Recreation Area: Shrubs and Endemics    Postponed until 2008

Poaceae    This workshop is FULL - wait list only. Note revised dates.
May 5 –6, 2007

Spring Flora of the White Mountains
May 10–13, 2007

Mimulus
June 1–3, 2007

Eriogonum: A Weekend of Wooly Knees
June 8–10, 2007

Flora of the Panamint Mountains
June 21–24, 2007

The Ecology and Epidemiology of Lyme Disease in the West   Registration fee reduced
June 30, 2007

Flora of the Great Basin, Nevada
July 12–15, 2007

Lupinus
July 20–22, 2007

Preparation and Importance of Bird and Mammal Museum Study Skins: The Museum of Vertebrate Zoology "Method"   This workshop has been CANCELLED

July 28–29, 2007

Progress and Problems in Potentilleae (Rosaceae)   This workshop has been CANCELLED
August 3–5, 2007

An Environmental History of Tanoak    Postponed until 2008

Mushrooms and Mycorrhizae
Lodging for this workshop is FULL but there is still space for participants who arrange for his/ her own accommodations
November 9–11, 2007

Instructors

Basic Botany Series

Introduction to Morphology and Identification of Flowering Plants
March 17–18, 2007

Linda Ann Vorobik
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

Would you like to learn how to identify wildflowers or refine your skills and expand your botanical vocabulary? If so, join us for this workshop where we will explore plant classification and the detailed morphology of flowers and fruits. Emphasis will be on learning the floral characters needed to identify plants using The Jepson Manual and other identification guides. Participants will also learn the specialized features of groups such as grasses and composites. Throughout the class, participants will be introduced to plant families that are commonly encountered in California. This workshop is designed to start at an introductory level and is appropriate for both beginners and those seeking an in-depth review.

Course fee $115/$140

Registration information


Fifty Plant Families in the Field    This workshop is FULL - wait list only
March 24–25 and March 31–April 1, 2007 (2 consecutive weekends)

Linda and Richard Beidleman
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley with Bay Area field trips

This course will be an introduction to the flora of the San Francisco Bay region and the techniques used to identify plants of California. It is designed for those unfamiliar with plant identification keys who are ready to jump into botanical detective work. Emphasis will initially be on the recognition and keying of plant families encountered in the field. With a working knowledge of common plant families, and comfort in using plant keys, identification is an enjoyable challenge. This is also a great way to appreciate plants and take the time to look at them closely. Although this course will involve no collecting of plants, we will discuss the nature, use, and importance of herbarium collections. There will also be an introduction to reference books valuable for the identification of plants in California. An historical perspective on botanical collecting in California will also be presented. Class will be outdoors except the first morning, which will be held on the UC Berkeley campus in the Valley Life Sciences Building. Participants in the class may drive up to 75 miles per day and hike up to 3 miles each day. Students must take day 1 before days 24, because the introductory information will lay the foundation for the rest of the course.

Enrollment is limited to 14 participants.

Course fee $175/$200

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Basics of Botanical Illustration
March 24–25, 2007

Linda Ann Vorobik
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building and UC Botanical Garden, Berkeley

During this weekend, participants will learn how to create accurate pencil drawings of plants and plant parts. No experience is necessary. Experienced illustrators will have the opportunity to hone their techniques. The skills taught will emphasize drawing using scientific methods, field sketching, and reading and interpreting existing scientific illustrations. We will have the opportunity to examine plants in the lab using the dissecting microscope. During a visit to the UC Botanical Garden, we will focus on the illustration of large plant parts and habit sketches.

Course fee $115/$140

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Basic Collecting Techniques and Vouchering Specimens
April 14–15, 2007

Abigail J. Moore and Michael Park
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

The collection and storage of plant specimens in herbaria remains an important aspect of systematic botany. Whether such material is used for molecular or morphological studies, all relevant specimens must be catalogued and cited.This workshop is designed to lead students through each of the steps of collecting plant material for inclusion in a herbarium. Topics will include the proper handling of specimens, specimen labeling, avoiding various collection bias(es), and the ethics of collecting. Students will practice collecting, drying, mounting, and if appropriate, pressing specimens of fungi, algae, lichens, mosses, conifers and flowering plants. Methods for preparing difficult to handle specimens such as cacti and other succulents, palms, and conifers will also be discussed. This workshop will include a tour of the University and Jepson Herbaria to familiarize participants with the general organization of a herbarium as well as the manner in which specimens are stored.

Course fee $115/$140

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Using Electronic Keys (MEKA) to Identify California Plants
April 28, 2007 (8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon)

Thomas J. Rosatti and Christopher Meacham
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

The futuristic promise of the electronic age was to make communication effortless, speed up analyses, diagnose illness with a painless, external scanning device, and procure a specially prepared, hot meal by requesting it from a sleek touch-screen. As computers progress to be more powerful and smaller in size, more applied uses of these instruments evolve daily. Devices, such as the Personal Data Assistant (PDA), combine portability and large storage capacity, thereby allowing us to take fewer reference books into the field as we become more adept at using the electronic resources now available. Programs for creating electronic keys have been available for decades, but only recently have efforts been made to use them to enhance identification on the scale of an entire state flora. Christopher Meacham, who invented the program (MEKA) in use at UC/JEPS, will demonstrate the many ways this tool enhances identification, and Thomas Rosatti, who is using the program to produce keys to California plants, will help participants use the keys to identify fresh material. Because the MEKA keys are not yet compatible with Macintosh operating systems, this workshop will be held in a PC computer lab and is limited to 14 participants.

Course fee $35/$60

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Introduction to Using Jepson Online Resources
April 28, 2007 (1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.)

Thomas J. Rosatti and Christopher Meacham
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

The current proliferation of internet-based resources has greatly enhanced the ability to conduct biological research and has improved access to information about the natural world for people with all sorts of interests and backgrounds. At the same time, however, the sheer bulk of such information and lack of certainty regarding its quality has prevented these resources from reaching their full potential. This workshop aims to introduce participants to the Jepson Online Interchange and other powerful resources available to them through the Jepson Herbarium web site. The workshop will combine lecture, hands-on work with computers, and discussion to illustrate how to best use these important, convenient, and free resources.A r eading of "Jepson Online Interchange for California Floristics" (Fremontia 31(2):23-29) beforehand is encouraged and a general knowledge of computers and how to use a web browser (like Internet Explorer or Safari) is essential. This workshop will be held in a PC computer lab and is limited to 14 participants.

Course fee $35/$60

Registration information


Tree of Life Series

This focused series is available to you at a reduced registration rate, supported by the CIPRES project (Cyberinfrastructure for Phylogenetic Research; www.phylo.org; NSF grant number NSF EF 03-31494). These courses are intended as an introduction to phylogenetics and related tree of life principles; no prior coursework is necessary. Visit www.phylo.org to brush up on the basics of phylogenetics. Workshop hours are 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. unless otherwise indicated. Registration is $35 for Friends of the Jepson Herbarium members or educators and $50 for all others. We hope you can join us to learn more about current techniques and recent findings from this exciting project!


Microbial Diversity: The Final Frontier
January 20, 2007

Dan Buckley
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

Microorganisms are the Earth's firstborn. They were teeming on the land and in the seas for billions of years before the evolution of plants and animals, and their genetic and physiological diversity is staggering. These organisms have fundamentally influenced the development of our biosphere and they continue to do so today, but we are only beginning to understand their ecological significance. In their efforts to characterize microbial species and populate the tree of life, microbiologists must surmount obstacles that are unique in biology. Prior to the birth of molecular phylogenetics, the lack of phylogenetically informative characteristics for Bacteria and Archaea largely prevented microbiologists from establishing taxonomic designations above the level of genera. In addition, formal classification required the growth and isolation of microorganisms in artificial laboratory media, and yet the vast majority of microorganisms are recalcitrant to cultivation in isolation. These limitations led to the longstanding belief that microbial diversity is low and that extant taxa are universally distributed around the globe. The birth of molecular phylogenetics has caused a revolution in microbiology and now the discovery of new orders and even new phyla of Bacteria is almost routine in studies of complex environments such as soil. Considering that a single gram of soil can contain tens of billions of cells representing thousands of taxa, the potential biodiversity harbored in the Earth's soils is truly staggering. However, the identification of new lineages is hardly the most challenging aspect of microbial phylogeny. Microorganisms can evolve with astounding rapidity and their ability to exchange genes across species boundaries challenges the very principles that we use to construct the tree of life.

In this workshop, we will discuss the tree of life from a microbial perspective. Using stromatolites and microbial mats as an example, we will review the astounding functional and phylogenetic diversity of the microbial realm and its impact on the evolution of the biosphere and we will use this as a jumping off point to learn about the tools that we can use to discover novel microorganisms and to characterize the extent of microbial diversity in natural systems. Efforts to estimate the global extent of microbial diversity hinge on two fundamental concepts, which are still hotly debated in the scientific community. The first is the idea of microbial biogeography. Are microbial species universally distributed as a result of their small size and their extremely large populations, or do they exhibit biogeographical patterns of distribution? The second is the species concept itself and whether and how it applies to microorganisms. By discussing these ideas we will gain an appreciation for microbial evolution, the extant of microbial diversity, and the microbial contribution to the tree of life.

Course fee $35/$50

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Evolution and Genomics: The New Modern Synthesis
January 27, 2007

Jeffrey L. Boore
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

Only a few years ago, the world was anticipating the production of the complete sequence of the human genome. Now, because science has quickly capitalized on the techniques and facilities developed for that project, we are seeing a tidal wave of complete genome sequences of hundreds of organisms (see www.genomesonline.org).

Biologists today refer to the "modern synthesis" period of the early 20th century as being the time when evolutionary biology found its proper mechanistic basis in the burgeoning field of genetics. Today, we are approaching a new modern synthesis, as we can see laid bare in these many complete genome sequences the marks of the patterns and processes of genome evolution, albeit written in a language we are only beginning to understand. From mice to mosquitoes and from bats to bacteria, we are beginning to see the grand sweep of organic evolution and reconstructing the evolutionary changes in biochemical pathways, finding the duplications of genes and even whole genomes, and recognizing both the unity and the diversity of life's basic processes. Evolutionary analysis of gene families is guiding the inference of gene function and large-scale features of genomes are being compared to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships among organisms with unprecedented accuracy (and quite a few surprises!).

In this workshop, we will cover the techniques by which genomes are being sequenced and studied, the ways in which organisms are chosen for these programs, and some of the scientific discoveries being made at the interface of evolutionary biology and genome sciences.

This course will be at an introductory level and the goal will be to explain clearly and plainly the many simple issues behind the seemingly complex jargon of these fields.

Course fee $35/$50

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Assembling (and using) the Fungal Tree of Life
February 3, 2007

David S. Hibbett and Jason Slot
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

Fungi represent one of the major branches of the tree of life. The group includes about 100,000 described species, but the actual extant diversity has been estimated to be as high as 1.5 million species. Fungi function as pathogens, mutualists, and decayers, and they have played key roles in the evolution of terrestrial ecosystems. Fungi have been challenging subjects for ecological and evolutionary studies, owing to their simple, cryptic morphologies and sparse fossil record.

This workshop will provide an overview of fungal phylogenetic diversity, and an example of how molecular phylogenetics is being used to address problems in fungal ecology. The first part of the workshop will include a synopsis of the historical concepts of what "fungi" are, and our current understanding of the position of fungi and fungus-like organisms in the tree of life. The second part of the workshop will involve a hands-on exercise in fungal phylogenetics, focusing on mushroom-forming fungi. This exercise will illustrate convergent evolution of strikingly similar fruiting body forms, and the use of morphology and molecular sequences for phylogenetic inference. The last part of the workshop will focus on an intriguing fungal symbiosis, involving the non-photosynthetic "indian pipes" plant (Monotropa uniflora). Indian pipes parasitize green, photosynthetic plants via fungal intermediates. This class activity will use phyloinformatics methods to identify the fungal partners of the indian pipes and consider what the results imply about the evolution of parasites.

High school and middle school teachers are particularly encouraged to attend. Materials necessary to replicate the activities in the classroom will be provided.

Course fee $35/$50

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"Arm-chair" Tree-Building: Phylogenetic Analysis Using Bioinformatic Resources
February 10, 2007

Kirsten Fisher
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

You may think that constructing a phylogenetic tree of your favorite organisms or genes involves a lot of lab-work with pipettes, chemicals, and a lot of patience. However, an enormous volume of phylogenetic data is accessible and readily available in web-based databases and can be synthesized to pursue a variety of interesting biological questions. From gathering sequences to phylogenetic analysis, this workshop will show you how one can perform molecular phylogenetics in the comfort of your own home: all you need is a computer with an internet connection!

This workshop will introduce you to some of the publicly available genomic and sequence databases and will show you how to use them to gather sequences for the organisms, proteins, or genes you are interested in. We will explore some r esources especially tailored to plants, as well as some more general databases. This workshop will demystify some of the various file formats used in molecular phylogenetics and help you understand what to use where. We will also explore some of the phylogenetic software that is freely available on the web and have demonstrations on how to use some of these programs to do sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis. Finally, we will explore ways of using phylogenetic trees and publicly available data and software to ask interesting biological questions.

This workshop is at an introductory level and some background in phylogenetic trees and what they represent would be beneficial.

Course fee $35/$50

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Vertebrate Phylogenetics
March 10, 2007

Matt Brandley
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

Representing less than 5% of the species on earth, vertebrates have historically been the focus of intense, some say disproportionate, biological study. Through literally hundreds of years of morphological study, of both the extant and extinct vertebrates, and the DNA revolution in the past few decades, the vertebrate tree of life has become one of best studied and best supported of any major lineage of organisms. Concomitant with the development of the tree of life has been the application of this phylogeny to address countless questions in evolution, ecology, genetics, physiology, behavior, and other fields.

How can paleontologists detect shared ancestry between whales and cows? What does the present-day distribution of vertebrate species tell us about the past 400 million years on earth? This course will explore these and other questions by studying the vertebrate tree of life. We will discuss what vertebrates are, including an overview of the major lineages, both fossil and living, when they arose in history, and how evolutionary biologists use morphological and molecular characteristics to trace change through time (and why we are certain of some relationships, but not others), including a hands-on examination of some of the homologous structures that reveal shared ancestry in distantly-related groups. While familiarizing ourselves with the different major lineages and their phylogenetic affinities, we will discuss applications of the vertebrate phylogeny. A major theme of the course will be "innovations", that is, what adaptations allowed for subsequent flourishing of different evolutionary lineages. We will also learn about how scientists use the tree of life to detect the historical biogeography of several vertebrate groups (where did they live in the past?) and the influence of continental drift and dispersal (why do they live there now?). The course will include small lectures, hands-on activities, and thorough discussion.

Although certainly not required, a general knowledge of evolutionary theory, phylogenetics, and vertebrate morphology is helpful. A willingness to learn and a head full of questions to discuss will be even more helpful.

Course fee $35/$50

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Meet the Authors Series

Chorizanthe
April 20–22, 2007

James L. Reveal
Location: Sedgewick Reserve, Santa Barbara County

The genus Chorizanthe Benth., found in the same subfamily as Eriogonum Michaux (Eriogonoideae), contains 50 species, nearly half of which are designated by CNPS as special status and/or uncommon. Distribution is restricted to temperate western North America and southwestern South America. Although the genus has clear morphological characters, getting an individual keyed to the species level can be challenging. This workshop will also cover additional, closely related genera that make up the subfamily Eriogonoideae in Polygonaceae. The purpose of this workshop will be to (1) review the history of discoveries, (2) review the general morphology and taxonomically significant features of the plants, (3) illustrate the major taxonomic groups and species complexes, (4) discuss the ecological and habitat characteristics as well as the distribution of Chorizanthe and relatives in California and elsewhere, (5) work with commonly available and recently rewritten keys, and (6) have hands-on experience identifying various members of the group in the field and laboratory.

Course fee $350/$375 includes all meals and lodging for the duration of the workshop. Indoor lodging is limited and on a first-requested, first-served basis. Most participants will camp near the lodge.

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Eriogonum: A Weekend of Wooly Knees
June 8–10, 2007

James L. Reveal
Location: James Reserve, Mt. San Jacinto

The genus Eriogonum Michaux is one of California's largest and most frequently encountered genera of flowering plants. It ranges from the edge of the Pacific to the heights of the Sierra Nevada to the shore of an ancient pluvial lake near Badwater in Death Valley. With some 115 of the 240 species of Eriogonum within California's political boundaries, those interested in the flora of the state must be aware of the diverse variation encountered in the genus and the additional genera that make up the subfamily Eriogonoideae in Polygonaceae. The purpose of this "Workshop on the Eriogonoideae" will be to (1) review the history of discoveries, (2) review the general morphology and taxonomically significant features of the plants, (3) illustrate the major taxonomic groups and species complexes, (4) discuss the ecological and habitat characteristics as well as the distribution of eriogonums and relatives in California and elsewhere, (5) work with commonly available and newly revised keys, and (6) have hands-on experience identifying various members of the group in the field and laboratory.

Course fee $350/$375 includes all meals and lodging for the duration of the workshop. Lodging is in dormitory-style bunk or twin beds.

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Poaceae    This workshop is FULL - wait list only
May 12–13, 2007

Travis Columbus
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

"I am the grass; I cover all" (Carl Sandburg, Grass). Prominent in plant communities throughout California, the grass family (Gramineae or Poaceae) is the state's second most diverse plant family (after Compositae). A species-rich assemblage, its members include cool-season and warm-season species, annuals and perennials, natives and exotics, and widespread dominants to rare endemics. A better understanding of this ubiquitous and diverse family can be gained through this workshop. Participants will be instructed in detail on the vegetative and reproductive features of grasses. Aspects of anatomy, physiology, ecology, and ethnobotany will also be addressed. Most time will be spent learning to use the identification keys in The Jepson Manual. Special attention will be given to difficult couplets and taxa. In addition, participants will learn how to determine major tribes and common genera by use of diagnostic characteristics. Sunday, there will be a field trip to a serpentine prairie to examine grasses in a natural setting.

Course fee $225/$250

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Lupinus
July 20–22, 2007

Teresa Sholars
Location: Sagehen Creek Field Station (Nevada County)

With 74 perennial taxa, Lupinus is one of the largest genera in California. It is taxonomically complex and poses a challenge to those who wish to identify members of the genus. This workshop will introduce participants to the different complexes of perennial lupines in California. Emphasis will be on identification of montane taxa in the field. Fresh material, herbarium specimens, and slides will also be used to show the morphological features that differentiate the complexes. Specialized lupine terminology will be discussed and explained. Local field trips will be taken to key specimens in the field using The Jepson Manual. An overview of the ecology and ethnobotany of lupines will also be discussed.

Course fee $350/$375 includes meals and lodging for the duration of the course. Lodging is on bunk or twin beds in shared rooms with adjacent bath-house.

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Progress and Problems in Potentilleae (Rosaceae)   This workshop has been CANCELLED
August 3–5, 2007

Barbara Ertter
Location: Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory (near Mammoth Lakes)

The tribe Potentillaeae consists of hundreds of species worldwide, primarily in north temperate and arctic regions. Most species are in the genus Potentilla (cinquefoils), which is notorious for complex hybridization and asexual forms of reproduction. The convergence of independent morphological and molecular studies now indicates that some species previously included in Potentilla stand better as distinct genera, so Dasiphora, Drymocallis, and Comarum will join Potentilla in the second edition of The Jepson Manual. Join us to get the inside scoop on these generic adjustments, and to learn how to cope with plants that laugh in the face of a rigid species definition. The workshop will also cover Ivesia, Horkeliella, and Horkelia, all restricted to western North America, leading to discussions on island biogeography in a continental setting and the pros and cons of paraphyly. One or more field trips will allow direct experience with plants in the field, including complex multi-species populations.

Course fee $350/$375 includes meals and lodging for the duration of the course. Lodging is bunk-style in quad-occupancy rooms with shared, indoor bathrooms.

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Weekend Workshops

Peatmosses (Sphagnum)
February 24–25, 2007

Jonathan Shaw
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

Peatmosses dominate many wetland habitats and can form deep deposits of partially decomposed plant matter (peat) that have a substantial impact on the global carbon budget and therefore on global climate change. Peatmosses (Sphagnum) differ from other mosses in a host of microscopic and macroscopic features and have a sometimes well-deserved reputation for being difficult to identify. There are about 90 species of Sphagnum in North America, and more than a dozen occur in California. We will examine the general anatomical features of peatmosses and then focus on the characters used to distinguish species. A key to California species will be provided and we will use this to practice identifying species, with emphasis on those likely to be encountered in California, Oregon, and Washington.

Course fee $225/$250

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Bryophyte Inventory and Sampling Techniques
March 2–4, 2007

Jim Shevock
Location: UC Berkeley and East Bay Regional Parks

This weekend workshop is specifically designed for (1) botanists engaged professionally in conducting inventories, (2) botanists who want to expand their floristic skills to include surveys for bryophytes, and (3) botanists who want to develop checklists or bryofloras of either physiographic (i.e., mountain range, river basin) or administrative units (National Parks, National Forests, State Parks, counties, etc.) Although no prior field coursework is required, having either vascular plant inventory experience and/or a bryology introductory course prior to this workshop would be beneficial. This course will require specimen sampling over uneven terrain. Proper footwear (boots) and field clothing is required.

In a field setting, this workshop will focus on a variety of team and individual exercises specifically designed to train non-bryologists how to "see, sample, and document" the diversity of bryophytes in a selected geographical area. Exercises will focus on documentation techniques for bryophytes, recognition of micro-habitats, and determining how to find rare taxa at any given location on the landscape. Lab and lecture activities will concentrate on various techniques used to sample bryophytes, how to succinctly capture ecological data at the time of collection, and how to process specimens efficiently for identification. Bryophyte herbarium specimen preparation, adequate bryophyte label data, specimen gift for determination procedures, and record keeping for documentating inventory results will also be provided and discussed. Dissecting microscope use will also be incorporated to sort samples into genus and species groups. Although bryophyte inventory work is generally not season-specific like flowering plants studies, it does require several different techniques and skill development in order to identify the dominant and rare species present at the site to be sampled. At the conclusion of this course, participants will be better prepared and skilled at conducting bryophyte inventory and sampling activities.

Course fee $300/$325 includes light breakfast, lunch, and transportation to field sites.

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Spring Flora of Eastern San Diego and Imperial Counties
April 5–8, 2007

Jon P. Rebman
Location: Anza Borrego State Park, from Bow Willow Campground

The eastern portion of San Diego County is a land of botanical opportunity, as spring rains coax desert species into flower. Imperial County, known more for its off-road vehicle parks and intensive border patrol than its floristic offerings, is also rich with unique desert species. Based out of the southeastern portion of Anza Borrego State Park, we will venture into Imperial County to visit Algodones Dunes and see dune endemics such as Peirson's Milkvetch (Astragalus magdalenae var. peirsonii), Croton wigginsii, Eriogonum deserticola, and Sand Food (Pholisma sonorae) and return to San Diego County through the Mountain Spring area of the In-Ko-Pah Mountains where Wolf Cholla (Cylindropuntia wolfii), Nolina bigelovii, and the Jacumba Monkeyflower (Mimulus aurantiacus var. aridus) are common. We will encounter various desert, chaparral, and juniper communities as we head north through Anza-Borrego to the San Felipe Creek area. Along the way, we will see arid-adapted species like Gander Cholla (Cylindropuntia ganderi), Desert Agave (Agave deserti var. deserti), Desert Lily (Hesperocallis undulata), Elephant Tree (Bursera microphylla), and the elusive, internal parasite Pilostyles thurberi. Plus, if rainfall is adequate there should be a large diversity of spring annuals.

Course fee $450/$475 includes campground fees, meals, and passenger van transportation for the duration of the workshop. Lodging is in a primitive campground with pit-toilets and stored water.

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Lichens of the Mojave National Preserve
April 12–15, 2007

Larry St. Clair
Location: Desert Studies Center, Mojave Desert, Zzyzx

This short course in lichens of the Mojave National Preserve will emphasize the diversity and unique ecological features associated with these remarkable symbiotic systems. Specifically, we will examine the lichen communities associated with soil surfaces, basalt outcrops, and local native shrubs. Classroom instruction will include basic information about the morphology, reproduction, physiology, and ecology of lichens. We will also learn about the basic tools, resources, and thallus features essential to the proper identification of lichen species, including growth form, algal partner, reproductive features, preferred substrates, and secondary chemistry. We will also discuss the complex nature of the relationship that binds lichen symbionts together into a truly remarkable, mutualistic system. In the laboratory, we will explain and practice the basic techniques used to identify lichens, focusing on the local flora. During a day-long field trip we will examine and discuss lichen communities at several locations in the Mojave National Preserve. A series of reference materials will be distributed at the workshop.

Course fee $425/$450 includes meals and lodging for the duration of the workshop. Sleeping accommodations are in double occupancy rooms.

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Off the Beaten Path in the Shasta National Recreation Area: Shrubs and Endemics    Postponed until 2008

John O. Sawyer
Location: Shasta-Trinity National Forest

Lake Shasta and Mount Shasta dominate the list of destination points for a myriad of recreational pursuits in northern California. However, back roads and hiking trails that traverse this area offer access to more remote and lesser-known gems within the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. This workshop will visit botanically interesting, less-traveled sites around Lake Shasta, checking out the plants growing on limestone. The focus will be on shrub identification and seeing the endemic Shasta snow-wreath (Neviusia cliftonii) in bloom. We will spend Friday botanizing in the Low Pass Creek area of the Devil's Rock-Hosselkus Research Natural Area. We should find at least 17 shrub species that day. On Saturday we will hike from Dekkas Rock campground in search of another diverse set of shrubs. On Sunday we will see the Waters Gulch population of Shasta snow-wreath and other shrubs, this time not on limestone.

Course fee $450/$475 includes campground fees, meals, and transportation for the duration of the workshop. Lodging is in a developed, lakeside campground with pit-toilets and running water.

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Spring Flora of the White Mountains
May 10–13, 2007

Jim Morefield
Location: White Mountain Research Station, Owens Valley Lab in Bishop

The White Mountains are located at the southwest corner of the Great Basin floristic region, and their geologic and habitat diversity, high relief (over 10,000 feet from bottom to top), and proximity to the Sierra Nevada and Mojave Desert all contribute to an unusually rich flora. They contain one of the most thoroughly documented vascular floras of any desert mountain range, with nearly 1,100 taxa in 89 families and 375 genera. At lower elevations, the spring flora is characterized by a high diversity of flowering shrubs and other perennials, and in favorable years is especially rich in annual species of both Mojave Desert and Great Basin affinities.

The workshop will begin Thursday evening in Bishop with an evening slide show. Friday morning through Sunday afternoon will involve day trips to lower- elevation areas around the base of the range, showing the best flowering conditions and/or interesting assemblages, and returning to Bishop each evening for more slides and discussion. One day-trip may approach the snow line to observe the earliest species at higher elevations. Through driving tours in our 12-passenger vans and easy to moderate walks (elevations generally 4,000 to 7,500 feet, and possibly to 10,000 feet), participants will have the opportunity to explore the general vegetation and geology of the lower White Mountains, explore and identify the flora of several different desert communities and habitats, and learn to observe some of the geographic and ecologic factors influencing species distributions and adaptations. Driving distances may be up to 100 miles each day and we will stretch our legs each day with short to moderate hikes.

Course fee $475/$500 includes research station lodging fees, meals, and transportation for the duration of the workshop. Lodging is in dormitory-style bunks with shared bathrooms.

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Mimulus
June 1–3, 2007

Steve Schoenig
Location: Sequoia/Kings Canyon National Parks

California is the center of Mimulus diversity. Of 100 species world- wide, more than 60 occur in the state. Mimulus diversity is especially rich in the central and southern Sierra Nevada, where over 45 species and forms of monkey flower occur. Mimulus is not only an ecologically and evolutionarily interesting genus, it is also one of the most showy and beautiful. Members of the genus exhibit specific adaptations, patterns of endemism, and species distributions that reflect some of the great themes of California botany, such as response to fire, edaphic endemism, occurrence in vernal pools, specialized pollination syndromes, hybridization among taxa, and large morphological variability within species. This workshop will focus on the central Sierra Nevada taxa and will discuss Mimulus throughout the state. We will also discuss Mimulus evolution, ecology, and conservation while visiting some beautiful monkey flower hotspots. We will use The Jepson Manual key and review the relevant morphology. There will be keying of dried and fresh specimens. A draft of text and pictures from an upcoming book on California Mimulus will be distributed.

Course fee $350/$375 includes campground fees, meals, and transportation for the duration of the workshop. Lodging is in a private campground with pit-toilets and running water.

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Flora of the Panamint Mountains
June 21–24, 2007

Dana York
Location: Death Valley National Park, from Mahogany Flat Campground

The Panamint Mountains represent a significant north-south trending geologic feature dividing Death Valley from Panamint Valley. At 11,049 feet elevation, Telescope Peak represents the highest point in the Panamint Mountains and Death Valley National Park. Less than 20 miles away from Telescope Peak is Badwater; at 282 feet below sea level it is the lowest point in the Western Hemisphere. With this kind of difference in elevation, the plant communities in the Panamint Mountains are uniquely diverse and range from creosote bush scrub on the lowest slopes to bristlecone pines on the highest peaks.

The 7-mile trail to the top of Telescope Peak is one of only two constructed backcountry trails in all of Death Valley National Park. This lofty stretch of the Panamint Mountains catches and holds a lot of snow during winter, but the peak can sometimes be climbed without difficulty as early as mid-March with only a mile or so of deep ridgeline snow.

This workshop will introduce participants to the flora and geology of the region while exploring the upper Panamint Mountains. We will learn about the region's unique flora and landscapes from the Telescope Peak Trail. Emphasis will be given to the Panamint's several endemic and rare taxa. Participants will have an opportunity to explore the following plant communities: desert mountain springs, black brush (Coleogyne ramosissima), sagebrush (Artemisia spp.), pinyon/juniper (Pinus monophylla/Juniperus osteosperma), limber pine (Pinus flexilis), and bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva). Avid birdwatchers will also enjoy the myriad bird species known from the Panamints. Lastly, if we are lucky, the group will have an opportunity to see desert bighorn sheep.

Course fee $450/$475 includes campground fees, meals, and transportation for the duration of the workshop. Lodging is in a primitive campground with pit-toilets and stored water.

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Flora of the Great Basin, Nevada
July 12–15, 2007

David Charlet, Pat Leary, and Jim Holland
Location: Great Basin National Park, from Snake Creek Campground

The Great Basin region is much more than just a big desert basin. It also includes high mountains with montane, boreal, and alpine environments. While the basins average less than ten inches of rain per year, the high mountains can receive more than 50 inches of precipitation a year. The basins themselves are cold deserts and their high elevation means that most moisture is received as winter snow deposits. Local hydrology and soil conditions largely determine the distribution of widely different plant communities in these desert basins. Above the basins, precipitation increases and temperature falls as elevation increases, and these factors result in a wide array of communities and species found in the Great Basin's mountains. At least 411 plant species are found in Great Basin National Park in the South Snake Range of Nevada. Of these species, at least 13 are sensitive and four are narrow endemics (Primula nevadensis, Jamesia tetrapetala, Silene nachlingerae, and Eriogonum holmgrenii). The plants serve as important habitat for the region's wildlife species and are also interesting and beautiful in their own right. Join us for this special trip to another of Nevada's jewels to discover the rich flora and explore the unique adaptations some plants have evolved for thriving in such a harsh and varied system.

Course fee $450/$475 includes campground fees, meals, and transportation for the duration of the workshop. Lodging is in a primitive campground with pit-toilets and stored water.

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Special Series

An Environmental History of Tanoak    Postponed until 2008

Frederica Bowcutt
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley with field trip to Marin County

Coast redwood and Douglas-fir dominate the lion's share of text written on California's Pacific Coast timber industry. As the subject of early logging history, these softwood trees take on mythic proportions as the gigantic old growth challenge to capable loggers and the charismatic megaflora of preservationists. However, the lesser- known hardwood tree tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus) tells an interwoven but different story from its associated conifers. Tanoak's tale gives us a unique perspective on the history of white settlement and the rise of industrial forestry. In the 1850s, conflicts over tanoak use occurred between tribal animists who depended on the acorns as a staple food and Christian white settlers who used the acorns for hog fodder and later stripped the bark for tanning. Decades later, progressive-era foresters and laissez-faire capitalists conflicted over forestry practices. By 1950, utilitarian conservationists catalyzed the beginning of today's dominant tanoak management practice in industrial forests: eradication. Today sudden oak death (SOD) caused by the non- native pathogen Phytophthora ramorum threatens tanoak as many populations exhibit mass die-off. Also, a new understanding of the evolutionary history of California's tanoak is emerging based on molecular-based research. During this comprehensive workshop, participants will spend day one learning through lecture and discussion about the environmental history of tanoak. Participants will also get an update on its current status and explore current research specific to tanoak and the pathogen causing SOD. We will spend the second day in the field, joined by forester Michael Swezy of Marin Municipal Water District to witness the effect of the SOD outbreak on tanoaks on the Bolinas Ridge area as well as other sites in Marin County.

Course fee $225/$250 includes refreshment breaks on Saturday and transportation and a sack lunch for Sunday's field trip.

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Mushrooms and Mycorrhizae
Lodging for this workshop is FULL but there is still space for participants who arrange for his/ her own accommodations
November 9–11, 2007

Matteo Garbelotto and Teresa Sholars
Location: Albion Field Station and private ranch in Mendocino County

Have you ever wondered just how important mycorrhizae are in our environment? Are you interested in the ecology and biology of this fascinating fungal association? Join two experts in the biology of these behind-the-scenes organisms for a weekend workshop exploring the north coast forest ecosystem in which mycorrhizae are abundant. Topics will include an introduction to mycorrhizae, their ecology and biology, and how changes in the environment affect their association and abundance. We'll also be treated to an introduction in basic mushroom identification skills and anecdotes, traditions, and recipes of Italian mushroom dishes.

Course fee $350/$375 includes field station and lodging fees and meals for the duration of the workshop. Lodging is in double-occupancy rooms with twin or double beds.

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Berkeley Natural History Museum Series

We are pleased to offer this new series in cooperation with the museums that make up the Berkeley Natural History Museum (BNHM). The topics have come from suggestions taken during our botanical workshops. On behalf of BNHM, we hope you find our new series intriguing!


The Ecology and Epidemiology of Lyme Disease in the West   Registration fee reduced
June 30, 2007

Bob Lane (lead instructor)
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

Lyme disease was identified as an important tick-borne disease in the 1970s. Over the past two decades, much research has been devoted to this spirochetal disease and debate has developed concerning its diagnosis and treatment. Academic scientists, government agencies, Lyme disease patients and infectious disease physicians are all motivated to discover new insights and a better understanding of this disease and are constantly researching and exploring deeper understandings to improve diagnosis and treatment. Lyme disease is of interest across the professional medical and scientific communities and to the general public, especially outdoor enthusiasts and those living on the urban/rural interface. In California, over 2,000 cases have been reported to the California Department of Health Services since the disease became reportable to the Department in 1989. Some cases presented to physicians are minor or curable, while others exhibit long-term problems impacting both the patient and their families.

For this special workshop, we will convene a panel of experts from the medical, scientific research, and diagnostic communities, each of whom works directly with the subject of Lyme disease in California. Their presentations, along with personally relayed case-histories from those living with Lyme disease and a moderated discussion, will summarize the latest understanding of most aspects of this disease. Topics to be addressed include how it persists in natural systems and infects humans, how ticks are tested for both surveillance and diagnostic purposes, approaches to diagnosis in humans, treatment protocols, why the disease can be difficult to diagnose and treat, and a summary of education and support resources.

Course fee $75/$100

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Workshop Schedule

8:30 a.m. Welcome & Introductions of Instructors and Participants
8:55 a.m. The Ecology of Lyme Disease - Robert S. Lane, Ph.D., Professor of Medical Entomology, Department of Environmental Science Policy & Management, University of California, Berkeley
9:55 a.m. Morning break
10:15 a.m. Epidemiology of Lyme Disease in California - Anne Kjemtrup, Ph.D., M.P.V.M., D.V.M., Veterinary Epidemiologist, Vector-Borne Disease Section, California Department of Health Services
11:00 a.m. Dilemmas of Diagnosing Lyme Disease - Dr. Gary Green, M.D., Physician, Infectious Diseases Chief, Santa Rosa Kaiser Permanente Medical Center
12:00 p.m. Lunch break (on your own)
1:00 pm. Tick Diagnostics - Kerry A. Padgett, Ph.D., Senior Public Health Biologist, Vector-Borne Disease Section, California Department of Health Services
1:30 p.m. Real Numbers: A look at tick data from Sonoma County - Dr. Gary Green (presenting David Yong, Sonoma County Health data)
2:00 p.m. Another View on Diagnosis and Treatment - Dr. Ray Stricker, President of International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society
2:40 p.m. Afternoon break
3:00 p.m. Patient panel - Reginald Barrett, Lee Lull, and MaryLynn Barkley
3:30 pm. Moderated Group Panel Discussion with patients, instructors, and participants
4:30 p.m. Workshop ends

Preparation and Importance of Bird and Mammal Museum Study Skins: The Museum of Vertebrate Zoology "Method"   This workshop has been CANCELLED
July 28–29, 2007

Monica Jane Albe and Jeffery T. Wilcox
Location: Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley

The Museum of Vertebrate Zoology (MVZ) at UC Berkeley houses over 640,000 specimens of amphibians, reptiles, birds, bird eggs or nests, and mammals, as well as over 50,000 tissue samples from these vertebrate groups. These research collections are ranked as one of the largest in the United States, and the largest of any university museum. These specimens are valuable for teaching, reference, and research. Some research pathways include DNA extraction from tissues for genetic analysis, morphometrics, and measuring morphological characters for studies of species variation. The first part of the class will include a tour of the MVZ and an overview of museum philosophy and the importance of specimens why we collect, prepare, and curate specimens. We will highlight some past uses of the collection and feature current research projects in the museum. We will also review the details involved in getting and keeping vertebrate study skins, such as permitting issues, record keeping, archiving specimens, and pest control. Our instructors, who have a combined catalogue of over 1,842 specimens, will demonstrate protocol for preparing a bird and a mammal study skin. Participants will be provided with a specimen and have up to one full day to prepare a study specimen of their own.

Course fee $175/$200 includes materials for preparing one specimen.

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Instructors

Monica Jane Albe is a Senior Museum Scientist at the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, UC Berkeley. She is manager of the Museum's Specimen Preparation Laboratory, as well as beingthe museum'spreparator. She also manages the museum's volunteer program and website and assists researchers with their field work in various localitiesacross North America. Monica received her B.A. in Integrative Biology from UC Berkeley, focusing on natural history and evolution of the vertebrates.

Richard Beidleman has a Ph.D. in Biology (Ecology) from the University of Colorado and has taught at the Univeristy of Colorado, Colorado State University, and The Colorado College (now Professor Emeritus). A Research Associate at the Herbaria, during summers he teaches field courses in Colorado. His most recent book is California's Frontier Naturalists (University of California Press).

Linda Beidleman has an M.S. in Biology from Rice University. She is co-author of Plants of the San Francisco Bay Region and Plants of Rocky Mountain National Park. She has worked with the California Native Plant Society, especially as co-supervisor for the CNPS East Bay plant nursery. Linda teaches short flora courses for Rocky Mountain National Park, Aspen Center for Environmental Studies, and The Colorado College Elder Hostel program.

Jeffrey L. Boore is Head of Evolutionary Genomics at the DoE Joint Genome Institute, CEO of a bioinformatics and consulting company called Genome Project Solutions, and Associate Adjunct Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at UC Berkeley, where he teaches one- third of the course "Evolution." Jeff received his Ph.D. in Biology at the University of Michigan in 1992. His research emphasizes the patterns and processes of the evolution of genomes, the use of evolutionary principles for inferring gene function, the comparison of mitochondrial and plastid genomes, and the use of large-scale genome- level features for reconstructing the evolutionary relationships among organisms.

Frederica Bowcutt teaches botany at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. She obtained Bachelor's, Master's, and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California. Prior to completing her Ph.D. in Ecology at UC Davis, she worked as an ecologist for the California Department of Parks and Recreation. She has also worked as an environmental consultant, doing rare plant surveys and ecological restoration. Dr. Bowcutt has published floras on state parks in the North Coast Range and Central Valley of California. Her essays have appeared in the journal Human Ecology and an anthology compiled by Carolyn Merchant entitled Green Versus Gold: Sources in California's Environmental History. She is currently working on a book entitled Tanoak Malpractice, which is a forest history of a region in northern California.

Matt Brandley is a Ph.D. student in the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology and Department of Integrative Biology at UC Berkeley. As a child in Oklahoma, he beat the odds and became fascinated with evolution. He currently combines his life-long interest in evolution and vertebrate biology to study the phylogenetic history, morphology, and biogeography of lizards and snakes. His research interests also include testing and refining methods of phylogenetic analysis.

Dan Buckley, Assistant Professor of Soil Microbial Genomics, is a member of the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences at Cornell University. He earned his Ph.D. at Michigan State University by studying the diversity and dynamics of soil microbial communities in agroecosystems. A postdoctoral fellowship from the National Science Foundation allowed him, while at the University of Connecticut, to explore relationships between microbial diversity and ecosystem function in marine microbial mat communities. During this time, he was also affiliated with the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, where he helped to teach the Microbial Diversity summer course. His research program at Cornell focuses on soil microbial diversity and its role in regulating ecological processes.

David Charlet received his M.S. in Biology and his Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology from the University of Nevada, Reno. He is a Professor at the Community College of Southern Nevada in the Las Vegas Valley, where he teaches biology and environmental science classes. His research is focused on the natural history of the Great Basin and Mojave Desert. He is also currently working on the Clark County Multi-Species Habitat Conservation Plan.

Travis Columbus is a plant systematist at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden. He has been interested in grasses since his undergraduate days in New Mexico. He received his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley working on Bouteloua and related taxa. His current research involves a monographic revision of Bouteloua and relatives.

Barbara Ertter is Curator of Western North American Flora at the University and Jepson Herbaria. She attended [Albertson] College of Idaho, University of Maryland, and the New York Botanical Garden, where she studied with the authors of The Intermountain Flora. Taxonomic specialities include Juncaceae, the Potentilleae (Rosaceae), and native species of Rosa, and he has also developed expertise in the history of botany in California. She is primary author for the Potentilleae for Flora of North America North of Mexico and The Jepson Manual.

Kirsten Fisher is currently a post-doctoral researcher at Duke University. In 2004, she completed her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, where she studied systematics and biogeography of a tropical moss group. She has taught basic phylogenetic theory, systematics, general botany, and bryophyte biology in high schools, public workshops, and university classes.

Matteo Garbelotto is an Assistant Cooperative Extension Specialist and Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at UC Berkeley. He has three primary research interests: 1) study of microorganisms, particularly fungi, in forest systems, 2) study of introduced microorganisms in forest ecosystems, and 3) study of mushrooms that provide viable alternatives to timber production in our forests.

David S. Hibbett is an Associate Professor in the Biology Department of Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts. He is a Co-PI on the NSF-supported, multi-laboratory Assembling the Fungal Tree of Life project, which seeks to reconstruct the major branches of the fungal phylogeny using molecular and morphological data. He has written on morphological and ecological diversification in fungi, focusing on Basidiomycota (mushroom-forming fungi and relatives), and has contributed several pages on Basidiomycota to the Tree of Life Web Project.

Jim Holland is a native of Las Vegas and completed a B.S. in Zoology and Botany at University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He is a park planner at Lake Mead National Recreation Area, where he has worked for the past thirteen years. He is a collaborator on the monumental project, The Flora of Southern Nevada.

Bob Lane is a professor and entomologist in the Division of Insect Biology, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management at the University of California, Berkeley. His laboratory is studying the ecology, epidemiology, and prevention of tick-borne diseases, particularly the spirochete (bacterium) that causes Lyme disease. This research includes field and experimental assessment of the ability of human and nonhuman-biting ticks to acquire, maintain, and transmit the spirochete and also study of the role of rodents and lizards in perpetuating it.

Pat Leary is a professor at the Community College of Southern Nevada, where he has taught biology and botany for the past 22 years. His publications, for the public as well as the scientific community, include an article on his discovery and description of a narrowly endemic species from the Spring Mountains, Ionactis caelestis. His magnum opus is his collaboration with Wes Niles and James Holland, The Flora of Southern Nevada, the first publication of which is nearly ready, The Flora of the Spring Mountains.

Christopher Meacham received his Ph.D. (Botany) from the University of Michigan in 1981. After a postdoctoral appointment in Computer Science (Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland) and a faculty appointment at the University of Georgia, he moved to UC Berkeley and was part of the original Museum Informatics Project. He became affiliated with the Herbaria in 1996 and is now a staff member responsible for continued development of the Herbaria web resources. Chris is the creative force behind the development of MEKA.

Abigail J. Moore is a graduate student in the Department of Integrative Biology. She is particularly interested in the Compositae, with a focus on the genera Grindelia, Balsamorhiza, and Wyethia. She is working on systematics of Grindelia for her dissertation. In addition, she is also interested in the flora of California and the West and how past climate, geology, and other organisms have impacted the evolution of this flora.

Jim Morefield began studying botany as a student at Deep Springs College and spent many field seasons during the 1980's exploring and revising the flora of the White Mountains. After finishing a degree in Botany and Geology in Flagstaff, Arizona, he completed a Ph.D. at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, where he studied Stylocline and related genera of composites. He contributed The Jepson Manual treatments for these genera plus Chaenactis. Currently, Jim works as the botanist for the Nevada Natural Heritage Program.

Michael Park is a graduate student in the Department of Integrative Biology and has extensive collecting experience throughout the western United States. Current research pursuits include evolutionary studies within Eryngium (Apiaceae) of the New World, mating system investigations in Collinsia, and collaboration to prepare treatments on Eryngium (Apiaceae) and Collinsia for the second edition of The Jepson Manual. He has also worked extensively on the flora of the Mount Diablo area, and plans to publish a flora that extends the fine work by Ertter and Bowerman The Flowering Plants and Ferns of Mount Diablo, California eastward to Morgan Territory and beyond. In 2005, he rediscovered the Mount Diablo buckwheat (Eriogonum truncatum) which hadn't been seen for 70 years. To aid in its conservation, he is researching the role of disturbance (landslide and animal use) and competition in the maintenance of the only known population.

Jon P. Rebman is the Mary and Dallas Clark Endowed Chair/Curator of Botany at the San Diego Natural History Museum. He has a B.S. in biology from Milliken University, Decatur, Illinois; an M.S. in biology from Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri; and a Ph.D. in botany from Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona. His research interests include the taxonomy of the family Cactaceae, especially the genus Opuntia, and floristics of the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico.

James L. Reveal was born in Nevada, raised in California, and schooled in Utah. He spent 30 years as a Professor of Botany at the University of Maryland, retiring with emeritus status in 1999. Now living in Montrose, Colorado, he continues studying the eriogonoid members of the knotweed family as well as expanding upon his nomenclatural work on extant vascular plant names above the rank of genus.

Thomas J. Rosatti received his Ph.D. (Botany) from the University of Michigan, 1983. After a postdoctoral appointment at the New York State Museum, he came to UC Berkeley in 1987 as the Scientific Editor of The Jepson Manual (TJM). After eight years as coordinator of the SMASCH project (1992-2000), Tom was appointed Editor of the Jepson Flora Project and Scientific Editor of TJM2. In these roles, he developed and is maintaining several of the resources comprising the Jepson Online Interchange (e.g., ICPN, MEKA keys, Guide for Authors Contributing to TJM2), and is working extensively with authors to prepare their treatments for publication online and in TJM2.

John O. Sawyer is Professor of Botany at Humboldt State University, where he has taught plant ecology and taxonomy classes for 34 years. He was named Scholar of the Year at Humboldt State in 1997 for his study of vegetation of California. He was honored as a Fellow of the California Native Plant Society for efforts on behalf of the California flora. He contributed several taxonomic treatments to The Jepson Manual: Betulaceae, Grossulariaceae, Rhamnaceae, and Salicaceae.

Steve Schoenig is an Environmental Research Scientist with the Integrated Pest Control Branch of the California Department of Food & Agriculture. He has Master's degrees in Entomology and Biostatistics from UC Davis. For the past 20 years, he has been photographing and collecting monkey flowers throughout California. In 1998, he completed his goal of photographing all species of Mimulus within the state and began writing the text for an upcoming book on California Mimulus.

Jonathan Shaw is a Professor of Biology at Duke University. He received his M.S. from the University of Alberta in 1980 and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1983. After 8 years teaching at Ithaca College, he moved to Duke University in 1996. His research over the years has focused on a variety of topics related to the ecology and evolution of bryophytes and he is currently working on the systematics and population genetics of peatmosses (Sphagnum).

Jim Shevock is a Research Associate at University and Jepson Herbaria and California Academy of Sciences. He is an active field botanist with a focus on the distribution of bryophytes (mosses and liverworts) and their conservation. His work has discovered many flowering plant and bryophyte species new to science. He is currently a Research Coordinator for the National Park Service with the Californian Ecosystem Studies Unit stationed on the UC Berkeley campus.

Teresa Sholars is Professor of Biology, Agriculture, and Forestry at the Mendocino Coast Campus of College of the Redwoods. She has been teaching, writing and presenting papers about the following topics: 1) the identification and ecology of plants, animals, and fungi on the Mendocino Coast [mushrooms and lichens], 2) Mendocino Coast Rare plant conservation 3) North American lupine systematics, and 4) redwood and pygmy forest conservation and management. She authored Lupinus for The Jepson Manual (1993) and its forthcoming revision.

Jason Slot is a Ph.D. candidate in the Hibbett laboratory at Clark University in Massachusetts. He has broad interests in the ecology and evolution of fungi, with a focus on symbiosis. Currently, he is studying the evolution of proteins involved in nitrogen uptake and metabolism in mycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi. He is a former high school biology teacher, and has been involved in outreach efforts in the Hibbett lab, including creation of the Teaching the Fungal Tree of Life web site.

Larry St. Clair received his B.S. and M.S. degrees at Brigham Young University and his Ph.D. at the University of Colorado. He is professor of Integrative Biology at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. He also serves as director of the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum and curator of the Herbarium of Nonvascular Cryptogams. The herbarium houses one of the largest lichen collections in the United States.

Linda Ann Vorobik holds a B.A. and a Ph.D. in biology and has taught numerous college courses in biology and scientific illustration. An illustrator for over 20 years, her work appears in many scientific books and journals including The Jepson Manual, A Flora of Santa Cruz Island, and The Jepson Desert Manual. She is currently working on illustrations for Flora of Santa Catalina Island, Flora of San Nicolas Island, and the grass volumes for the Flora of North America North of Mexico.

Jeffrey T. Wilcox holds a Bachelor of Sciences degree in Resource Sciences from the University of California, Davis. For 10 years, he has been the Ecological Coordinator for a private wildlife reserve in Santa Clara County. Prior to that, Jeff worked as a taxidermist for 27 years for various employers including the University of California, Davis; the Oakland Museum of California; and the Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Section of Mammals. In his current position, Jeff is fortunate to be able to donate time at the UC Berkeley Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, where he prepares scientific specimens.

Dana York received his M.S. (1999) from California State University, Fresno, in biology and botany, and his B.S. (1984) in forest management from Humboldt State University. He has worked on floristic and special- status species surveys throughout California and Oregon on both public and private lands. He has discovered new plants in the Sierra Nevada and Death Valley National Park. He was Death Valley's botanist for nearly five years. He currently works in Oregon as a Forest Service botanist. He lives in Roseburg with his wife, Eva, and two children.

  Copyright © 2007 Regents of the University of California — Updated September 21, 2007