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Archived News from the University and Jepson Herbaria

See home page for current announcements


Jepson eFlora is formally posted

UC/JEPS and growing trend to associate herbarium archives with specimen data

Jepson Herbarium Workshops 2011 Year in Review

Volunteer Saturdays 2013-2014: September 14, October 12, November 16, December 14, February 8, March 15, April 12 (Cal Day), May 10.

SBFthumb.jpg

The SO BE FREE 18 botanical foray was held in the Cuyamaca Mountains near Julian, California, March 26 through 29, 2013. ... Read the details
UC received major funding as part of a large consortium to digitize bryophyte and lichen collections across the nation, in the new Advancing Digitization of Biological Collections program at NSF.

Isabelle I. Tavares: October 6, 1921–May 21, 2011


Visit by Kurdistan Botanical Garden Delegation

CalDay April 16, 2011!

Once again, the Herbaria flung open their doors to the public for the annual open house. Young and old alike crowded in to learn about the herbaria, see local wildflowers, press a specimen of their own, and hear talks by experts.

Major NSF grant received by the Consortium of California Herbaria

UC/JEPS Curator of Fungi John Taylor leads a novel study combining genomics and ecology in an important paper on bread molds

SO BE FREE 16 was held 23-26th March, 2011, in the northern Sierra Nevada Mountains

New Publications from UC Herbarium Researchers

CALIFORNIA MOSSES Co-authored by UC/JEPS researchers Dan Norris and Jim Shevock, with famed macro-photographers Bill and Nancy Malcom. This book is a work of art as well as of science, and is available from the California Native Plant Society. The book features easy-to-read descriptions of each species, as well as spectacular photos of habitats, reproductive structures, and high-quality color micrographs of key morphological features. Available from the California Native Plant Society.


MAGNIFICENT CHINESE AND AMERICAN REDWOODS
Edited by UC researcher Momei Chen, this book features the ancient redwood lineages in both China and the United States, and provides scientific material in both Chinese and English. The book bridges language and cultural barriers and will hopefully focus public attention on these endangered trees in both countries.


Learn about our contributions to the
Global Plants Initiative, a searchable online database of type specimens from herbaria around the world!


Current Workshop Information

Groups needed as Curatorial Volunteers at the Herbaria

One Saturday of each month is a Volunteer Day in the Herbaria. Each Volunteer Saturday begins at 10:00am and finishes by 4:00pm (participants need not stay the full time).

The Volunteer Saturday dates for 2012-2013 are as follows:

September 15, October 13, November 17, December 8, January 12, February 9, March 9, April 20 (Cal Day), May 11


Your group can join us to learn about California flora, gain first-hand experience with herbarium techniques, provide much-needed assistance with the specimens, and socialize with fellow native plant enthusiasts. To be added to the Group Volunteer reminder list, please call Ana Penny at (510) 642-2465.

We also welcome individual volunteers who can come in on Volunteer Saturdays or during our regular hours (M-F 8am-5pm). We will try to match your unique interests, abilities and schedule to one of the numerous curatorial projects needing attention. For more information about individual volunteer opportunites, please call Andrew Doran at (510) 642-2465.


SO BE FREE 16 will be held 23-26th March, 2011, in the northern Sierra Nevada Mountains

moss photoSpring 2010: SO BE FREE 15 was held in New Mexico in late March, and was another successful foray facilitating interactions between beginners and experts in the study of mosses. See the trip report and photos!

Syntrichia ruralis. Photo by Russ Kleinman.



Isabella Kauakea Aiona Abbott, distinguished ethnobotanist and phycologist at the University of Hawaii — PhD in Botany from the University of California, Berkeley in 1950 and the first woman of Hawaiian ancestry to attain a PhD in science — passes away at age 91. More ...


CalDay 2010 Photos!

Once again, the Herbaria flung open their doors to the public for the annual open house. Young and old alike crowded in to learn about the herbaria, see local wildflowers, press a specimen of their own, and hear talks by experts.

All photos by Ana Penny


NEW ORCHID SPECIES!: Ornithidium donaldeedodii.

orchid photoNamed for orchidologist Donald Dod, who collected the specimen in Haiti in the 1980s, and who served, in his later years, as a research associate here at the UC Herbarium. Dod died in 2008, at 95.


A living specimen of the new species is blooming at the UC Botanical Garden, and has showy, flame-orange flowers. Photo by James Gaither.

The holotype specimen (right) is housed at the University Herbarium.


See the UC Berkeley news article about the discovery!

See the official scientific publication by Ackerman and Whitten in Lankesteriana.


Spring 2010: The University and Jepson Herbaria receive Canada-California Strategic Innovation Partnership.

This funding will support collaboration in biodiversity informatics with a consortium of Canadian herbaria, natural history museums and botanical gardens. The first meeting of the new consortium will be in Berkeley March 13 and 14. More information.

 


Fall 2009: The Moorea Biocode Project and Director Brent Mishler featured in California Magazine, the UC alumni publication.


CalDay 2009 Photos!



Summer 2009: UC Student wins Prize for Best Paper.

Eric Harris, recent Ph.D. from the Mishler Lab in the Herbaria, received the 2009 William Starling Sullivant Award from the American Bryological and Lichenological Society for best paper published in the previous volume of The Bryologist. The article is entitled "Ethnobryology: traditional uses and folk classification of bryophytes."

You can read the paper in The Bryologist 111(2), pp. 169-217. 2008.



Spring 2009: Dr. Tahbaz meets with Iranian botanists.

Dr. Fosiee Tahbaz, Curator of Middle Eastern Flora and Coordinator of the American-Iranian Botanical Program, meets with Iranian botanists at the Research Institute of the University of Ferdowsi Mashhad.

Left to right: Dr. Kiani, Dr. Mahdavian, Dr. Tahbaz, Dr. Rashed, Dr. Joharchi and Dr. Memariani.



 


May 1, 2, 3: The Jepson Herbarium co-sponsors the 2009 California Wildflower Show!

wildflower thumbnailVisitors to the Oakland Museum of California heard from the experts and savored the colors and fragrance of hundreds of freshly collected native flowers.

For a complete list of talks and Friday's sneak preview, click on the columbine at right. Or visit www.museumca.org for more information.

 


February, 2009: Iranian Botanist visits UC/JEPS Herbaria.

Dr. M. H. Rashed (center), Professor and former Dean of the Agriculture College and Director of the Herbarium of Ferdowsi University of Mashed, Iran, visits with Dr. Fosiee Tahbaz (left) and Dr. Brent Mishler (right) at the University Herbarium in Berkeley. Dr. Rashed was one of the collaborators in the American-Iranian Botanical Program exchange in 1999. Dr. Rashed has invited Drs. Mishler and Tahbaz to visit his university in Iran.

 

 

 


Celebrate Darwin's 200th birthday February 12th, 2009.

Special events on campus.

Brent Mishler quoted in ScienceNews "Evolution's Evolution."


SO BE FREE 14 ----March 24-27, 2009

The 2009 SO BE FREE bryological foray was held in the lower elevations of the central Sierra Nevada, near Oakhurst, California. The region offered montane coniferous forest, oak woodland with rocky outcrops, chaparral, and deep gorges cut into the granite by swiftly flowing waters. Bryophyte diversity spanned a range of life strategies, from California's spring ephemerals to the brown mosses of continuously wet sites. The wildflowers were at the peak of flowering.

Founded in 1996, SO BE FREE is a series of West Coast forays focusing on bryophytes, but open to all botanical interests and levels of experience. This year's event was organized by Paul Wilson. See the trip summary, with photos!



December 2008: Consortium of California Herbaria passes million record mark!
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden and Santa Barbara Botanic Garden together uploaded nearly 40,000 records to the Consortium data view, bringing the total number of specimen records served to 1.03 million. See the main Consortium search page.

2008 Holiday

The University and Jepson Herbaria had their holiday party December 17 2008. Santa Claus even put in an appearance, but we noticed that his phenotype has converged with that of a certain bryologist, who also happens to be the Director of the Herbaria. Happy Holidays to all, and best wishes for a fantastic New Year!


David Gowen featured in DISCOVER MAGAZINE, Nov. 2008, for his discovery of two new wildflower species near Mount Diablo

The Lime Ridge Navarretia (Navarretia gowenii) and the Lime Ridge Woollystar (Eriastrum sp. nov.) were discovered on East Bay public lands in an area that has been studied by botanists for 150 years. Outdoor enthusiast, retired carpenter, and UC/JEPS volunteer David Gowen was encouraged by the Jepson Herbarium's Barbara Ertter to persist in his search for rare and new species in the region. The California Native Plant Society, Save Mount Diablo, and the Walnut Creek Open Space Foundation are working together on a conservation plan.


October 2008: Bryophyte data going online!

Label data from 95,000 specimens collected by Dan Norris and Jim Shevock now available. See the data!


June 2008--Herbarium data used to project the effects of climate change. 

David Ackerly, Curator of Ecology at UC/JEPS and Professor of Integrative Biology, was the leader of a team that analyzed current distributions of over 2,000 California endemic plants based on data from the Consortium of California Herbaria and the Jepson Flora Project.  The team discovered that many of these species are in great danger unless they can move to new localities with appropriate climate.


The Jepson Herbarium participates in 2008 California Wildflower Show at Oakland Museum
shootingstarpicOn April 19th and 20th, hundreds of wildflowers from around the state were on display!
Slide lectures were presented on horticulture, California flora, and the history of plant collecting in the state.

Oakland Museum Wildflower Show.
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High-level Iranian officials make a rare visit to the University and Jepson Herbaria
iranmapDecember 2007--High-level Iranian officials made a rare visit to the University and Jepson Herbaria, seeking to augment ongoing scholarly collaboration with UC Berkeley scientists and students.

"Politics is going to fluctuate, but science is something that is not going to change with the president," said Dr. Mostafa Rahmani, director of the Islamic Republic of Iran's office at the Pakistan Embassy in Washington, D.C. "We need to invest for what is more permanent… Animosity is not going to go away unless these two great countries enhance their interaction in peaceful arenas."

Right: On a map of his nation, Iranian official Mostafa Rahmani spots sites of recent collaborative research by Iranian and UC botanists, as Dr. Foisee Tahbaz and Dr. Abolfazi Mehrabadi look on.
(Cathy Cockrell photo)

Read the UC press release
Learn about the American-Iranian Botanical Program
The first moss genome is published December 13th, 2007

mosspicThe first moss genome was published online in Science Express December 13th, 2007, in advance of its print publication in Science January 4th, 2008, providing insights into traits involved in the movement of plants onto land. University and Jepson Herbaria Director Brent Mishler co-authored the paper.

Learn more about it:

Read the UC press release.
Explore the The Moss Genome Project.

Bruce Baldwin receives Botanical Society of America Merit Award

Bruce Baldwin
Bruce Baldwin
At the 2007 national meetings in Chicago, the Botanical Society of America presented its prestigious Merit Award to Bruce Baldwin, Curator of the Jepson Herbarium and Professor of Integrative Biology.

“Dr. Bruce Baldwin is recognized for his contributions in plant systematics. Beginning in graduate school, Dr. Baldwin studied one of the icons of island biogeography, the Hawaiian Silversword Alliance. His dissertation work using chloroplast DNA was one of the pioneers on island plant groups and confirmed that this morphologically diverse group represented a single colonization event from ancestors in North America. Baldwin reconfirmed these results using nuclear genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. His development of ITS for plant phylogenetic study is perhaps his most widely recognized contribution. Less well-known outside of California is that Dr. Baldwin has made major contributions to plant floristics, through his efforts editing the Jepson Desert Manual and the 2nd edition of the Jepson Manual of California plants. For his many contributions to the systematics of Asteraceae, Hawaiian plant biogeography and evolution, and advances in molecular systematics, the BSA is pleased to recognize Dr. Bruce Baldwin with its highest award.”

The August 2007 newsletter of the American Society of Plant Taxonomists announced that its membership has selected Dr. Baldwin as the society’s President-elect for the coming year.

The ASPT has also selected Abby Moore as recepient of a Graduate Student Research Award for her population genetic study of the genus Grindelia (Compositae).

Welcome Anna Larsen, new Coordinator of Public Programs

Anna Larsen
Anna Larsen
In July 2007, Anna Larsen joined the staff of the Jepson Herbarium as Coordinator of Public Programs. Anna will have many responsibilities but the biggest component of her new position will be to develop and implement the 2008 workshop season. The full schedule will be available this fall and from the classes that she has planned so far, I can see that 2008 will be an exciting workshop season!

Many of you may have met Anna when she served as Interim Coordinator in 2005. When I asked her what she enjoyed most about that position she said “I love the people, the places we go, the plants we get to see and I love the sense of community.” When the position of full-time coordinator became available this summer, Anna was eager to apply.

Anna attributes her interest in science to her early introduction to the natural world – she grew up in rural Vermont about a mile from the Canadian border and she spent a lot of time in the woods behind her house catching monarch butterflies and climbing trees. Anna developed a strong interest in Botany as an undergraduate at Skidmore College when she took a non-majors course ‘Biology of the Green World’. This course opened her eyes to how closely the lives of people and plants are intertwined and led Anna to the popular literature on medicinal plants. Her interests continued to develop and eventually she came to UC Berkeley where she has pursued (and almost completed!) her Ph.D. studying the prehistorical co-movement of plants and people in Oceania.

During her dissertation studies, Anna traveled to the Society Islands, Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Indonesia, and Hawaii. She also lived in Australia for a year as an undergraduate. Through all of these travels, Anna has gathered many interesting stories to share around the campfire!

Anna has also been very active in the field of science education. She has taught various courses for UC Berkeley undergraduates including General Biology, Medical Ethnobotany, and the Biology and Geomorphology of Tropical Islands. She co-taught a natural history course for middle and high school biology students at Richmond High School and Adams Middle School. Most recently, she was an instructor for Project POSIT’s Summer Institute, a professional development partnership between the Oakland Unified School District and partner organizations, including the Berkeley Natural History Museums.

Each coordinator brings their own expertise to the position and we encourage each one to pursue their own professional interests. When I asked Anna how she would like to see Jepson’s education program develop, she said “I would love to see the program expand to include more opportunities for kids (or their science teachers) to get involved in nature and natural history. By the time they reach middle school, students are primed to understand how science works and they still have the energy and enthusiasm for getting involved. That’s the age when you can catch their interest. Kids really come alive when they get the chance to get out of the classroom and get into nature.”

Welcome Anna, we all look forward to working with you as you continue the excellent tradition of the Jepson workshop program and expand the opportunities for a new audience!

Learn more about Anna’s work by visiting the Contra Costa Times website and viewing a presentation that recently featured the GK12 Exploring California Biodiversity Project. The presentation is of a field trip to the intertidal zone, including high school students, classroom teachers, and graduate student researchers. View the online Flash Slideshow.

—Staci Markos

Congratulations to our graduate students!

Herbaria graduates 2007
From left to right: Eric Harris (PhD), Elizabeth Zacharias (PhD), Anna Larsen (PhD), Professor Bruce Baldwin, Ruth Kirkpatrick (PhD), Professor Brent Mishler, Danica Harbaugh (PhD), Professor Tom Carlson, Bianca Knoll (MS), and Andy Murdock (PhD).
Congratulations to our Herbaria graduate students! A large cohort of Herbaria-associated students were awarded their advanced degrees May 19th, 2007, at the Department of Integrative Biology graduation (fully 28% of the department's total!). A champagne reception, well-attended by family and friends, was held afterwards in the front room of the Herbaria to wish them continued success. (Click on images for larger versions.)
Herbaria graduates 2007

From left to right: Bianca Knoll, Elizabeth Zacharias, Anna Larsen, Andy Murdock, Danica Harbaugh, Ruth Kirkpatrick, and Eric Harris.

Joel Nitta (right), who did his senior thesis in Brent Mishler's Lab on filmy fern systematics, received the Integrative Biology Departmental Citation for the most outstanding undergraduate.

Two events celebrate the rediscovery of the Mount Diablo buckwheat

Mount Diablo buckwheat (Eriogonum truncatum)
Mount Diablo buckwheat
(Eriogonum truncatum)
Meet the Mount Diablo Buckwheat (Wednesday, May 16, 7 pm) and
First Annual Find the Mount Diablo Buckwheat Day (Saturday, May 19)

The Mount Diablo buckwheat (Eriogonum truncatum) had not been observed since 1936, and was considered possibly extinct until recently. A single population of the East Bay and Solano County endemic Mount Diablo buckwheat was found in 2005 by Mike Park, a graduate student at the UC and Jepson Herbaria. The Mount Diablo working Group has organized a Mount Diablo Buckwheat identification workshop to help botanists search for new populations. The world buckwheat expert, Dr. Jim Reveal, will demonstrate diagnostic morphological characters and identification tips. In addition, you can meet the buckwheat! Mount Diablo buckwheat individuals, in cultivation at the UC Botanical Garden, will be available for up close examination.

The workshop is an excellent way to prepare for the First Annual Find the Buckwheat Day. This event is co-sponsored by East Bay CNPS and the Working Group, and will be a coordinated survey for the buckwheat in historic locations and likely habitat in eastern Contra Costa County. Teams of botanists will survey and document their searches. Each team will be given maps and background data. Botanists of all backgrounds are needed to ensure thorough searches and documentation. Some teams will be searching in areas otherwise not open to the public. Find the Buckwheat day is a great opportunity to botanize new natural areas in the East Bay!

Two brochures are available from Mount Diablo Working Group. One is an identification guide for buckwheats in eastern Contra Costa County; the other is a pamphlet about the Mount Diablo buckwheat.

American-Iranian Botanical Program makes campus news

American-Iranian Botanical Program, coordinated by Dr. Fosiee Tahbaz, is featured in the Berkeleyan:

Fosiee Tahbaz - Photo credit: Barbara Errter
Photo credit: Barbara Ertter

Botanist Fosiee Tahbaz, coordinator of the American-Iranian Botanical Program, photographs a rarely sighted wild orchid during a 2004 botanizing foray to western Iran, undertaken with several of her Iranian and American colleagues.

Director Brent Mishler with Iranian representatives

Holiday Season 2006


Herbaria Staff 2006
Holiday greetings from all of us at the University and Jepson Herbaria and best wishes for a prosperous 2007!

Herbaria popular at Homecoming & Parents Weekend 2006

A recent report from the UC Berkeley News Center:

Kim Kersh and Danielle Hacker, Homecoming 2006 - Photo credit: Peg Skorpinski
Photo credit: Peg Skorpinski
Freshman Danielle Hacker and collections manager Kim Kersh examine a specimen of Mexican lily (Beschorneria yuccoides), collected from Cerro Tres Picos, north of Tonalá, Chiapas. A tour of the University and Jepson Herbaria, housing 2.2 million specimens, was a popular feature of Homecoming events.

Herbarium visit to Rockpile Ranch and Vineyard

In June, faculty, staff, and students of the herbaria spent a special day at Rockpile Vineyard, home of Jepson Trustee, Rod Park and his wife Cathy. Rod and Cathy hosted the group in a lovely outdoor setting with a "wild" pig roast and tastings of wine from the vineyard. After lunch, the group went on a short excursion to view petroglyphs and add to the plant list that was started during the herbarium's first trip to the ranch in the early 1990's.

Photo credits: Thomas J. Rosatti
Calochortus luteus - Photo credit: Thomas J. Rosatti
Calochortus luteus
The group at Rockpile Vineyard - Photo credit: Thomas J. Rosatti Lunch at Rockpile Vineyard - Photo credit: Thomas J. Rosatti The buffet at Rockpile Vineyard - Photo credit: Thomas J. Rosatti
Brent Mishler, Rod Park, and the group. Lunch on the front lawn. The fabulous buffet.

Herbaria host international moss conference

Moss: Physcomitrella patens
An international meeting of moss experimental biologists, Moss 2006 was held at UC Berkeley from June 26th through July 1st, 2006, hosted by Integrative Biology Professor Brent Mishler. The meeting, attended by 70 participants from all over the world, was timed to coincide with the completion of sequencing of the full genome of the moss Physcomitrella at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Dr. Mishler was one of two co-PIs on this project, and Integrative Biology Adjunct Professor Jeffrey Boore was the liaison with JGI. This moss genome, nearly 500 million nucleotides in size, is the first land plant genome sequenced outside the flowering plants. Many functional and evolutionary insights are already being discovered, and were presented at Moss 2006.

Cal Day Review 2006
Cal Day, April 22, 2006, was a tremendous success and saw thousands of people come through the Valley Life Sciences Building. The Herbaria were one of the main attractions with numerous exhibits designed at educating and reaching the public by interaction with herbarium staff, students, and volunteers. Five 'behind the scenes' tours gave parties a historical insight and overview of what the functions of the Herbaria are and how plants are collected, processed, and archived. The wild flower showcase was equally popular and received a lot of attention from young and old alike. Other exhibits included edible fungi, economic plants, T-shirt sale, and a UC Botanical garden display.  
Girl and carnivorous plant
Cal Day 2006 gave the Herbaria an opportunity to showcase research, outreach, and publications. We plan to make Cal Day 2007 equally as appealing with a host of new ideas to engage our visitors.
Wild flower display and lecturer
The wild flower display was hosted by staff and volunteers with children receiving miniature herbarium sheets that they could keep and use to identify by matching with living plants.
 
Director Brent Mishler with tour
Herbaria Director Brent Mishler explaining the use of historical specimens as part of the behind the scenes tour.
 
 
 
Second edition treatments are now available
Treatments prepared for the Second Edition of The Jepson Manual are now available for public viewing at ucjeps.berkeley.edu/jepsonmanual/review/. Treatments will be incrementally posted after they have undergone both technical and scientific editing within the Jepson Flora Project. Comments are currently being accepted; feedback is welcomed.

Herbaria web site gets a new look
March 27, 2006 — Over the next few weeks, many of the pages will be updated and some new features added. There may be a bit of reorganization and fine-tuning during this period. Thanks for your patience as we improve our site.

New publication
The Revised Catalog of Lichens, Lichenicoles, and Allied Fungi in California by Shirley C. Tucker and Bruce D. Ryan is issued as number 84 of Constancea.

Graduate student delivers keynote address at international conference

Danica Harbaugh visits the Colo-I-Suva Nursery in Fiji
Danica Harbaugh visits the Colo-I-Suva Nursery in Fiji

Graduate student Danica Harbaugh presented the keynote address to an international conference on sandalwood research.

The conference was held November 28 to December 1, 2005 in Nadi on the island of Fiji. Participants were invited from Pacific island countries and territories with additional representatives from Australia, Indonesia, Timor Leste, and the United States. The conference dealt with sandalwood research, development, and extension work in Pacific island countries and territories.

Danica's dissertation research focuses on reconstructing the phylogeny of the genus Santalum (Santalaceae) which includes the sandalwoods (commonly known for their use in the essential oil industry). She is interested in determining the evolutionary relationships of the taxa as well as in elucidating dispersal patterns of the genus throughout its distribution (Australia, India, Indonesia and the Pacific Islands). In addition, she is working on a taxonomic revision of Santalum and a monograph of the genus.

Pictures from the conference

Conference details: papgren.blogspot.com/2005/10/regional-sandalwood-workshop-spc-land.html

Mount Diablo Buckwheat rediscovered after 70 years
Mike Park - Photo credit: Scott Hein/Save Mount Diablo
Mike Park

Photo credits: Scott Hein/Save Mount Diablo

Mike Park, a graduate student in the Jepson Herbarium, has rediscovered a population of Eriogonum truncatum on Mount Diablo. Read about it in an article by Robert Sanders

Listen on NPR

Search Google

Eriogonum truncatum - Photo credit: Scott Hein of Save Mount Diablo
Eriogonum truncatum
New MEKA-Edit available
Chris Meacham, funded by a grant from the Lawrence R. Heckard Fund of the Jepson Herbarium, has produced a new version of MEKA-Edit, the program by which keys are constructed in MEKA. The new version takes advantage of Windows features to make key-building easier and more flexible. It also includes a converter so that MEKA keys may be displayed on the Web. MEKA-Edit, bundled with MEKA and keys to >150 genera of California Asteraceae, can be freely downloaded and distributed.

MEKA keys added to the Online Interchange
The multiple-entry keys for >150 genera, mostly of Asteraceae, that have been so far available only as as a download, have been converted by Chris Meacham to a format (SLIKS) that can be displayed directly in a browser. All the keys are listed on one page and each generic key is listed with the appropriate Interchange genus page (e.g. Ageratina) and linked to the Manual taxonomic treatments (e.g., Ageratina adenophora).

Danica Harbaugh receives Lawrence Memorial Award
During the BSA banquet at the Botany 2004 conference in Snowbird, UT, Danica Harbaugh was awarded the Lawrence Memorial Award, which commemorates the achievements of the founding director, Dr. George H.M. Lawrence, of the Hunt Institute of Botanical Documentation at Carnegie Mellon University. The annual award of $2000 is given to a doctoral candidate for travel as part of dissertation research in systematic botany or horticulture. Danica used the funding to conduct fieldwork in Australia in August-September 2004, as part of her dissertation on the phylogeny and taxonomy of the sandalwoods (Santalum, Santalaceae).
American–Iranian Botanical Program
Collection list for 2004 posted.

New features in the Online Interchange
The dichotomous keys from The Jepson Manual are now available online

 
See archive page for past news